Swedish Egg Coffee

| | Comments (6) | TrackBacks (0)

I'm still getting over the fact that this recipe calls for crumbled egg shell. I first spotted it some years ago, when I was perusing a hand-me-down Better Homes and Gardens New Cookbook. The new part of the title, of course, being irrelevant now because it was given to me in the early 1990s, passed on to me by my sister, who believed she had gotten it either for her wedding -- in 1976 -- or sometime thereafter. Cookbooks of yesteryear are mysterious with those unattractive photos and tips about using muffin pans to make groundbeef recipes. And yet, they're foodie-friendly with the Cafe au Lait to paella recipes. Note: to make foam for the au lait, the only machinery needed is a rotary beater. So quaint.
OK, back to Swedish Egg coffee.

I have traveled to Sweden and have never seen this mellow, even bland, drink on a coffeehouse menu anywhere. But on a Swedish genealogical web site, which includes a listserv that tackles this very recipe, the consensus was that this is a very Swedish-American drink popular in the 1800s and even through the 1900s, particularly at post-service luncheons in Lutheran Churches across Minnesota and beyond. I'm checking in with the Swedish American Museum in Andersonville for some kind of insight. Will update if I hear anything.
In the meantime, here's the recipe:
In a small bowl, combine 1 slightly beaten egg (reserve shell) and 2/3 cup of ground coffee. If you want it stronger, make it a whole cup. Add 1/2 cup of cold water; blend well. Stir in crumbled egg shell. Add to 8 cups of boiling watrer. Heat and stir over high heat until foam disappears, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat; cover; let settle about 7 to 10 minutes. Serve clear coffee of top or strain through fine mesh strainer. Cheers.

0 TrackBacks

Listed below are links to blogs that reference this entry: Swedish Egg Coffee.

TrackBack URL for this entry: http://blogs.suntimes.com/cgi-bin/mt-tb.cgi/6144

6 Comments

Lisa, you've put me in a very melancholy mood. I've never heard of this coffee, and it makes me wish my mom, grandmother, and stepmother's mother were alive -- I'd love to hear if they'd ever had it. 'Course none of them ever drank coffee the way I've been told Swedes drink their coffee -- from a saucer and through a sugar cube held between the teeth.

I don't remember Swedish egg coffee as described but I do remember my Swedish aunt (born in the 1870s) adding egg shells to her coffee grounds before brewing.

So how did it taste?

Beth,
It was pretty bland. Reminded me of my folks' 70s-era percolator-made Folgers. But I must say that the aftertaste was the worst I've ever experienced. I've never been so glad to brush me teeth. It was great to try, but I probably wouldn't waste my Dunkin' Donuts coffee, which is what I used here, to make the Swedish Egg Coffee again.
Thanks for writing.
Lisa D.

Beth,
It was pretty bland. Reminded me of my folks' 70s-era percolator-made Folgers. But I must say that the aftertaste was the worst I've ever experienced. I've never been so glad to brush me teeth. It was great to try, but I probably wouldn't waste my Dunkin' Donuts coffee, which is what I used here, to make the Swedish Egg Coffee again.
Thanks for writing.
Lisa D.

Okay, I grew up in Minnesota. My mother is from Sweden. I currently live in Seattle (the elitist coffee capital of the world) and even I can still appreciate Swedish Egg Coffee. If you really fancy yourself as a blossoming barista, first get over the Dunkin Donuts (what are you a mobster from Providence, Rhode Island?) and next learn to appreciate a culture beyond your own, or at least the homogenized suburban lifestyle that you currently call home.

Cheers!
Sven

Leave a comment


Type the characters you see in the picture above.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Lisa Donovan published on January 18, 2008 9:23 AM.

Becoming my own barista was the previous entry in this blog.

Oatmeal-Buttermilk Pancakes is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Pages