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Lisa Madigan asks Illinois Supreme Court to yank Blagojevich from office. Transcript.

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Transcript courtesy Federal News Service

MS. MADIGAN: Good afternoon.

This morning, my office filed pleadings with the Illinois Supreme Court, requesting that Governor Blagojevich be temporarily removed from office. In the alternative, we have asked that the Illinois Supreme Court declare that he is prevented from filling the U.S. Senate vacancy, acting on legislation, directing contracts, directing the activities of the Illinois State Finance Authority, directing the activities of the Toll Highway Authority, and directing the disbursement of state funds.

I have asked the Supreme Court to appoint the lieutenant governor as the acting governor, pursuant to the Succession Act. I recognize that this is an extraordinary request. But these are extraordinary circumstances.

As we learned on Tuesday morning, U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald arrested Governor Blagojevich at his home and charged him with criminal conduct that Fitzgerald described as a political corruption crime spree.

The criminal complaint alleges that in his own words, Governor Blagojevich was going to make decisions on official acts based on what was best for his legal situation, his personal situation and his political situation. As governor, Mr. Blagojevich's duty is to do what is best for the people of the State of Illinois, not for himself.

In light of his arrest and the filing of the criminal complaint, Governor Blagojevich can no longer fulfill his official duties with any legitimacy.

Based on Article 5, Section 6 of the Illinois Constitution and Illinois Supreme Court Rule 382, we filed with the Illinois Supreme Court a motion for leave to file a verified complaint for declaratory and injunctive relief, a verified complaint for declaratory and injunctive relief, a brief in support of the motion to file a complaint and a motion for a temporary restraining order and/or a preliminary injunction.

Let me note that the Illinois Supreme Court has discretion as to whether or not to hear this case. I would hope that, in light of these extraordinary and unprecedented circumstances, the court will provide the people of the state an opportunity to present their case. Because while the legislature is scheduled to convene in special session, on Monday, and I have encouraged them to move forward with impeachment proceedings, the impeachment process will take time.

In the interim, state government is paralyzed by a governor who is incapable of governing. My action will not eliminate the need for impeachment and trial. And the Illinois Constitution gives the Illinois Supreme Court the authority to determine a governor's ability to serve. As the attorney general, it is my job to serve as the lawyer for the people of the state. And it is my job to present this question to the court.

Let me also be clear that my pleadings are not -- they are not -- about whether the governor's conduct should result in his criminal conviction. This case is about whether the governor has the ability to legitimately and effectively carry out his duties and exercise his authority as governor.

The U.S. attorney has indicated that his office and the FBI will continue to investigate the allegations in the complaint and will continue to pursue this matter.

PAGE 4 12/12/2002 .STX ILLINOIS-BLAGO-MADIGAN This is a question of first impression for the court, and I believe it is necessary and appropriate to present this issue to the court.

Let me thank all of the lawyers in my office who have worked tirelessly since Tuesday on this matter. In addition, we are pleased to have Abner Mikva and Barry Gross serving as special assistant attorneys general on this matter.

Let me now introduce those people who you may not recognize who are standing behind me.

Alan Rosen, who serves as our deputy -- chief deputy attorney general.

Michael Scodro, who serves as the solicitor general for the state of Illinois -- somebody else who is hiding behind you.

Roger Flahaven, who serves as the deputy attorney general for civil litigation.

Paul Gaynor, who serves as the chief of the Public Interest Division.

Carl Bergetz, who serves as the chief of the Special Litigation Bureau.

John Rosenblat (sp), who serves as an assistant attorney general in the Special Litigation Bureau.

And Brent Legner, who serves as an assistant attorney general in the Civil Appeals Division.

With that, I would be happy to answer some of your questions.

Q General, I wonder if I could ask you -- I know you're in uncharted waters here. I'm wondering if you can give us any sense of what you think the timeline on this might be, you think, or -- in a proper legal fashion?

MS. MADIGAN: We would certainly hope that the Illinois Supreme Court would move forward recognizing these extraordinary circumstances, and therefore with speed, which is why we filed a TRO. However --

Q Would you explain to me about that?

MS. MADIGAN: Yes. We filed a temporary restraining order. And what that would normally do is accelerate the process of a lawsuit.

Q And what's -- the TRO basically spells out the same thing except it implies the urgency of the situation.

MS. MADIGAN: Correct. Correct, Andy.

But let me also state that Illinois Supreme Court Rule 382 is very bare-bones. It basically provides the ability to file a pleading with the Illinois Supreme Court, but does not set out any procedure or process after that for how they will choose to handle this.

So the Illinois Supreme Court could do virtually anything. They could deny us even the ability to file this complaint. They could grant a TRO. They could say that the governor should be removed immediately. They could say that they want briefing. They could read the pleadings and -- it's hard to say what they will do at this point.

Q General? General, the -- General?

Q Blagojevich could fight this if he wanted.

MS. MADIGAN: And if the court gives him that opportunity, yes.

Q And what --

Q General, a TRO -- a TRO in a case as serious as this would seem to be unlikely, would it not, given the court wanting to make sure and really hear arguments and pleadings before it takes a step this drastic?

MS. MADIGAN: Well, we thought it was important to file a TRO because of the urgency of this.

It has been three days since we learned of the criminal complaint and Governor Blagojevich's arrest. And in those intervening three days, there are matters of state business that cannot be moved forward in a legitimate manner.

And so we want to make sure that the court recognizes, as do the people of the state of Illinois, the urgency for us to have a governor who can legitimately and effectively exercise the duties of that office.

Q One follow-up to that, please.

MS. MADIGAN: Go ahead.

Q Legislative leaders believe that the impeachment process, if carried out as quickly as possible, would take perhaps a month. Do you believe that this could be done a lot quicker than that?

MS. MADIGAN: I do not know how quickly an impeachment procedure would take, and so the legislature will have to make that determination probably on an ongoing basis, if they decide to pursue that.

Q General, could give us an example or two of state business you know --

MS. MADIGAN: Sure.

Q -- is not being accomplished because of the governor's situation -- or for maybe -- or can you specifically --

MS. MADIGAN: I'm going to give you one example. Short-term borrowing -- as you are aware, the state of Illinois is behind in paying its bills, in particular to Medicaid providers. I believe we have a backlog of at least a billion dollars in bills. In order to make those payments, there was short-term borrowing that was scheduled in the very near future.

At this point, we -- they have postponed that. And it may be very difficult, if not impossible, to move forward on short-term borrowing, because as part of that process, as the attorney general, I play a number of roles. One is to essentially review and say that the short-term borrowing is legal, but another portion of that requires me to sign a certificate certifying that I am not aware of any proceeding or threatened litigation challenging the authority of the governor to hold his office. And so I at this point would not necessarily be able to sign that, and so I'm currently working with OMB to determine how we can proceed and handle that.

Q Is this the borrowing that was supposed to be done -- (off mike)? Is that one?

MS. MADIGAN: Yes.

Q But that's not --

Q Do you have that certificate in -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: I believe we do have that certificate.

Roger?

STAFF: We have it.

MR. MCCORMACK: We do.

Q Is this -- is this track different -- in other words, are you comfortable with this track or the track that you would take as the chief law enforcement officer of the state, that it doesn't have any -- it doesn't have any impact or might not have any impact -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: Correct.

Q If they go along with what you want to do, there's no need for legislature to take the appointment power away from the governor and there's no need for any of the impeachment --

MS. MADIGAN: Let me -- let me stop your question, because I have an answer. (Laughs.) I see where you're going.

No, with these filings, we still think that it is imperative for the legislature to make a decision and hopefully proceed with impeachment proceedings. What we're essentially saying to the Illinois Supreme Court is, based on these extraordinary circumstances, we want them to make sure that we put in place the lieutenant governor to serve as the acting governor so that the business of the state of Illinois can move forward, as opposed to having this interim period where we're paralyzed at the state level.

(Cross talk.)

Q General, what do you realistically -- (off mike) -- to then make their case --

MS. MADIGAN: Usually, with the TRO, there's a 10-day period for some sort of a response.

Mr. Scodro? Correct?

MICHAEL SCODRO (Illinois solicitor general): Yeah, or a five-day period.

MS. MADIGAN: Or a five-day period. (Chuckles.) So, obviously, one of the reasons for filing the TRO is to shorten that window. Normally, when we file a complaint, it's almost a month after service until anything occurs.

Q So you're hoping realistically to -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: Correct. As soon as possible, yes.

Q What sort of relief are you seeking in the TRO?

Q What duties do you not think that he's able to perform?

MS. MADIGAN: Say it again.

Q What duties do you not think that he's able to perform?

MS. MADIGAN: What we have put --

Q (Off mike.)

MS. MADIGAN: That is not contained in our pleadings. What we have delineated are all of the activities that were contained in the criminal complaint filed by the U.S. attorney, so the filling of the U.S. Senate seat; making any state disbursements -- and this is based on the apparent refusal to provide Medicaid reimbursement to Children's Memorial Hospital unless he received a campaign contribution from its CEO; the potential to not sign legislation on the racing industry subsidies unless he potentially received a campaign contribution; the desire to enter into any business regarding contracts. In particular, the Toll Highway Authority has a plan, over $1.8 billion plan, for further construction.

So what we've done is to delineate all of those things and say, if this Illinois Supreme Court does not want to put in place the lieutenant governor as the acting governor across the board, at least for these categories of activities he should be placed in that position, because it is unclear and obviously, we think, illegitimate for Governor Blagojevich to undertake any of those activities.

Q Did you have any -- did you have any concerns --

Q General?

MS. MADIGAN: You haven't had an opportunity.

Q Should Lieutenant Governor Quinn become governor, should he make the Senate appointment or should -- (off mike) -- go forward with a special election?

MS. MADIGAN: I'm in favor of the legislature moving forward with legislation to create a special election, but, obviously, it'll be up to them to make that determination.

Q General?

Q General, are you concerned about a conflict here -- (off mike) -- it's over as governor -- (off mike).

MS. MADIGAN: I serve as the attorney general of the state of Illinois.

And in that capacity, I am the lawyer for the people of the state of Illinois. We are facing an extraordinary situation. And so we want to make sure that this state has a governor who can act legitimately.

The law gives the authority to the Illinois Supreme Court to make a determination as to whether or not Governor Blagojevich is able to serve. We think it is very clear that he is incapable of serving, and we are certainly hopeful that the Illinois Supreme Court will hear this matter and appoint Lieutenant Governor Quinn as the acting governor.

Q In reference to 382 and the restraining order, is that something -- just so I -- some of us understand, is that something that someone only in your capacity could file, or could the average citizen file either one of those?

MS. MADIGAN: Rule 382 does not specify. And so as the attorney general, I serve as the lawyer for the people of the state. And because of that, I believe it appropriate to go to the state supreme court and file these matters.

Q (Off mike) -- ask you to be senator, will you take it?

MS. MADIGAN: I'm -- you know what, at this point, we are purely focused on making sure that state government runs for the benefit of the people of the state of Illinois. Political issues and political matters are not even on my radar screen this week.

Q If you were successful here, for how long would the governor not be the governor?

MS. MADIGAN: That depends on what happens. So if the Illinois Supreme Court would say that -- would temporarily remove Governor Blagojevich, appoint the lieutenant governor to serve as the acting governor, a number of things could happen.

The legislature could move forward on impeachment and ultimately impeach the governor, in which case the lieutenant governor would become the governor of the state of Illinois. They may choose not to do that.

In addition, obviously, the U.S. Attorneys Office plans on continuing their investigation and probably filing an indictment. Governor Blagojevich could lose his position if he is convicted.

In addition, there could be a circumstance where neither of those things occur, and then the Illinois Supreme Court -- that Governor Blagojevich could go back to the Illinois Supreme Court and ask them to remove this disability status and reinstate him as the governor.

Q Are you asking for a time -- are you asking for a period of time --

Q Does the governor keep his salary if he's temporarily removed? Does he continue to be paid if he's temporarily removed?

MS. MADIGAN: I do not believe that he should be, but I do not know the answer to that question.

Q Is there a period of time --

Q Attorney General, to what degree are you concerned that the justices may say that, while there is a sense of urgency here, that there is a legislative remedy to remove somebody from office? (Off mike.)

MS. MADIGAN: We obviously have that concern, but what we have laid out in our pleadings is that whether or not the impeachment proceeding moves ahead -- and let's assume it moves ahead -- there is still an intervening time period during which the state of Illinois is without a chief executive who can legitimately exercise the powers and duties of his office.

Q General? General?

MS. MADIGAN: Craig (sp). Craig (sp).

Q Is there any precedent in any state for a high court taking this kind of action -- (off mike)?

STAFF (?): Not that we're aware of.

MS. MADIGAN: Not that we are aware of.

Q Did you give any consideration to the intent of -- the intent of the law as framed by the constitutional convention, whether it was meant for a political or legal crisis like this or simply for some kind of, you know, medical or emotional issue?

MS. MADIGAN: I think the question you're getting at is, how is disability or is disability defined correct? And so yes, we did. It's addressed in our briefs.

We would look to the fact that the term disability legally is very broad, that it is not simply isolated to a physical or mental disability. And you can read all about that in our pleadings.

Yes.

Q (Off mike) -- didn't do enough to weed out corruption in the previous administration. What have you done to do that in the Blagojevich administration?

MS. MADIGAN: We have, as you know -- had, I should say, because it was a while ago obviously -- initiated an investigation at the time that Alderman Dick Mell stated that essentially Governor Blagojevich was trading appointments for campaign contributions.

At one point, as also you are probably aware, U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald asked us to cease our investigation and let them proceed, which we did. But since then, we do have personnel in the Office of the Attorney General who have provided assistance and information to federal law enforcement authorities. And that's all I can tell you.

Q Can I ask Judge Mikva a question, since he's standing behind you?

MS. MADIGAN: Do you have any more questions for me?

(Cross talk.)

Yes, then I will.

Q Is it fair to say, is it fair to say -- I don't want to put words into your mouth and I'm not sure you'd let me anyway -- that the reason you're doing this is, you think it's a crisis; it's an emergency, and this can be done quicker than impeachment.

MS. MADIGAN: Perfect. Yes.

Q (Off mike) -- ever been used for anything?

MS. MADIGAN: Not that we are aware of. Well, stop, yes, because in addition to whether or not the governor is able to serve, this rule also provides for redistricting cases to go immediately to the Illinois Supreme Court. And yes, it has been used for redistricting purposes.

Q General, are you concerned about -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: No, no, no.

My concern is to deal with the extraordinary circumstances that this state is facing right now. And obviously we want to make sure that the people of the State of Illinois have a governor who can legitimately fulfill the duties of that office.

Q Has your office received any communication at all from the governor's office?

MS. MADIGAN: I have not.

Q Are you aware of any other state agencies?

MS. MADIGAN: No, I am not personally aware of that. You can obviously call --

Q (Off mike.)

MS. MADIGAN: We have not. We have provided them with a copy on the 16th floor. A copy of the actual complaint is being served on him now.

Q When do you expect to hear from the Supreme Court, regarding -- (inaudible)?

MS. MADIGAN: Within a short period of time, but we do not know how long --

Q (Off mike.)

MS. MADIGAN: Pardon me.

Q Today?

MS. MADIGAN: We may not hear from them today. But they have received it. It has been filed.

Q You are asking for him not to be able to perform all these duties.

Is there any other duty that he can perform beside this, in terms of, he can still make any kind of decision as a governor? (Off mike.)

MS. MADIGAN: Well, the way that we determined what activities we were asking the Supreme Court to enjoin him from performing was based on the information that was contained in the criminal complaint filed Tuesday.

And so there may be other things he can do, ceremonial functions, but you're right, this covers the vast majority of what his duties would be, but not all of them.

Q Is your request for injunctive relief that would appoint Lieutenants Governor Quinn acting governor, is that ultimate request you seek or is that the TRO request?

MS. MADIGAN: That is the ultimate request, both in the TRO as well as in the complaint.

Q Okay. So it's never -- (off mike).

MS. MADIGAN: Correct.

Q Can I -- (off mike) -- Judge Mikva for a moment, to --

MS. MADIGAN: Yes, you guys are --

Q And would you just stick around in case there are any more for you?

MS. MADIGAN: I shall, indeed. (Laughter.)

Q Judge, I -- and I wanted to bring you up here because you're the only person with this unique perspective of having served in virtually -- in all branches of government and watched crises in different venues. And I'm wondering, would you think that this filing -- (off mike) -- as someone who's been protective of separation of powers? And also, you watched what happened to a former president under a lot of duress. What are your thoughts about this remedy?

MR. MIKVA: Well, I went over very carefully with the attorney general's staff what they were proposing to do and had input on it and made suggestions. I think this is the least invasive way of solving the immediate problem. It does not try to take over the legislative function. It invites the legislature to proceed as rapidly as they can.

One of the problems with the legislature proceeding on an impeachment route is that this legislature expires at the end of this month or shortly before that. It's inconceivable to me that any kind of a procedurally proper impeachment and removal could occur between now and the end of the month. That means that probably the legislature would have to start over again or at least complete its activities sometime after January 4th, when the new legislature takes over.

This is, as much as anything, a "hold fast" effort by Attorney General Madigan to allow the state to continue to operate during that period. It is -- it is very difficult if there's nobody in charge of contracts, if there's nobody in charge of the state apparatus to run the business of the state. And I think --

Q Let me ask you one, just --

MR. MIKVA: Sure.

Q On the same subject, though, what about potential conflicts between this court making that decision of empowering Pat Quinn at the same time that the legislature's trying to figure out whether to give Quinn the appointment over the Obama Senate seat or set a special election. Could you have competing tracks that are actually at odds?

MR. MIKVA: I don't think so. If the legislature -- there's no question that the legislature's supreme here. And if the legislature decides to act on any of these fronts, I think it supersedes certainly the request that the attorney general has made and probably the power of the court.

Q You think the legislature trumps the court?

MR. MIKVA: On these issues, absolutely.

Q Why is that? Because the court generally trumps the legislature on matters of jurisdiction.

MR. MIKVA: Well, on jurisdiction, fine, but on the substance of the matter, there is a removal procedure specifically spelled out in the constitution which the legislature is authorized to conduct.

There is the authority in the constitution and in the federal Constitution as well for the state legislature to decide how the vacancy should be filled. And so if they exercise either of those functions, I think that trumps the power of the court.

Q In your -- in your view, Judge, is the -- is the action that you're asking for by the Supreme Court temporary in nature or permanent in nature?

MR. MIKVA: It's temporary in nature in the sense that if the legislature acts or if the governor resigns, it would make this case moot.

Q But he would not, in any event, be removed permanently. And should the state legislature decide not to impeach him, he would be in a kind of -- of a suspension limbo.

MR. MIKVA: I think if the legislature decided not to remove him -- impeachment is only the first step. If the legislature decided not to remove him, I can't predict what the Supreme Court would do at that point. But there's nothing in the pleadings that have been filed on behalf of the attorney general which would say that the court must then step in for a permanent removal, where the legislature has decided not to. This is --

MS. MADIGAN: And let me -- let me -- let me --

MR. MIKVA: Sure.

MS. MADIGAN: And let me follow up for a moment. One of the reasons that we have sought the remedy that we've sought, saying that the governor should be temporarily removed, is that we recognize, again, the court may be reluctant to take up this matter. And to the extent that we can provide a remedy that is narrow, that's what we've tried to do. So instead of requesting permanent removal, we have requested temporary removal from office.

Q And why -- and why without -- why without pay? I ask you this because normally -- normally in these situations --

MS. MADIGAN: I think, Andy, I stated that I was unsure as to whether or not he would be paid.

Q And why is that? (Off mike) -- though, frequently, when you're suspended from -- (off mike) --

MS. MADIGAN: If it's temporary.

Q -- misdeeds, you're suspended with pay, pending the outcome. So why should this not be that way?

MS. MADIGAN: You know what? If he ends up receiving his pay if he is temporarily removed, I think that would be fine with the people of the state of Illinois.

Q Attorney General, how do you keep any credibility to make this motion, if you won't rule out taking the Senate seat should -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: I serve as the attorney general, right? And as the attorney general, I am the lawyer for the people of this state. I've served in this capacity for almost six years. And that is my focus today, is making sure that we have a governor who can legitimately rule this state.

I haven't been thinking about politics -- unlike the rest of you -- all week long. And so at this point, I have no comment as to my political future. I'm very happy serving as the attorney general, even though these are very challenging times.

(Cross talk.)

Q Do you believe that this is like a last pressure on the governor -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: Obviously, I think the people of the state would be best served if Governor Blagojevich would resign immediately. It would make our pleadings moot, so the Illinois Supreme Court would not have to contend with these matters. It would also make the legislature's process of impeachment moot, and we could all move on.

Q If you're successful, would Pat Quinn be able to appoint the senator?

MS. MADIGAN: It -- no. You all -- it depends. So, as you know, the Illinois legislature is coming into session on Monday to change the law, to put in place a special election to determine who is the next U.S. senator. And so, should that occur, I presume that -- but I do not know, because I am not the lieutenant governor -- that he would probably agree that the will of the people, having been expressed through the legislature, should prevail. And hopefully, he would sign the legislation.

Q But you're familiar with his statement?

MS. MADIGAN: I am familiar with his statement.

Q What's your reaction to that statement?

MS. MADIGAN: I think that the legislature is very wise at this point, considering the fact that Governor Blagojevich was apparently attempting to sell an appointment to the U.S. Senate, to change the law here in Illinois and provide for a special election.

Q General, is there a way to prevent other people, whoever might be AG in the future, from -- any protections to prevent others from using this law -- since this is the first time to have a governor sort of declared disabled -- to sort of have it be done sort of when the circumstances might not be as extraordinary? Are those protections there, or could this be filed at any -- could this --

Q Could this set a dangerous precedent?

Q -- (off mike) -- just happen again?

MS. MADIGAN: I'm still not understanding your question.

Q Are there enough protections in place to stop someone from doing what you're doing in the future?

Q For political ends.

Q From abusing the --

MS. MADIGAN: Oh, I'm sorry.

Q (Off mike) -- abusing the AG authority.

MS. MADIGAN: Yes. And here's one of the protections, as I mentioned. The Illinois Supreme Court has total discretion as to whether or not to even hear this matter. So the Illinois Supreme Court, Judicial Branch, serves as a check on the executive branch in the circumstance.

Q And this is the first time in history that this has been done.

MS. MADIGAN: This is the first time that, as far as we know, Rule 382 has been used for this purpose. As I indicated, it has been used for redistricting purposes. And I believe that this rule was, in fact, promulgated by the Illinois Supreme Court after the adoption of the 1970 constitution.

Q The TRO, is that basically like courts would give to a regular citizen, sort of standing order, he can't go into -- (off mike) -- center, he's not allowed in his office, that kind of thing?

MS. MADIGAN: Except he -- what we're saying is he should not be allowed to fill the U.S. Senate vacancy, do anything on contracts, do anything on legislation, do anything with the finance authority, do anything with the toll highway authority.

Q Does that mean he can do other things? (Off mike.)

MS. MADIGAN: To the extent, as we've noted, that there are other duties, right. And that is if they would choose our alternative remedy. Our first request and our preference in terms of a remedy, so as not to end up with all of these confusing questions, is that the Illinois Supreme Court would temporarily remove him and put in the lieutenant governor to serve as the acting governor for all the functions, for all the duties of the governor's office.

Q This is a bridge between today and what the legislature ultimately does.

MS. MADIGAN: Correct.

Q (Off mike.)

MS. MADIGAN: The interregnum.

Q The legislature, though, has to ultimately solve this by impeaching or not impeaching, and that would undo this -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: Right. It would moot that, as we like to say in law school.

Q I know you say that you haven't been thinking about politics at all, but there have obviously been a lot of questions about politics, and there wouldn't be questions about politics unless your political future was considered very bright and in play here. Given the fact of your possible interest in being governor, given the fact that you've been mentioned as a possible Senate replacement for Barack Obama, was any consideration given to your removing yourself from this issue because of a possible perception, if not reality, of conflict of interest?

MS. MADIGAN: No. And let me make two further statements. One is I never expressed any interest in even being considered for the U.S. Senate vacancy. I never contacted or talked to any -- the governor or anybody in the governor's office about that.

In addition, I am supporting putting the lieutenant governor in to serve as at governor of the state of Illinois. I think that is in the best interests of the people of this state. And I am happy to serve as the attorney general of this state. And I will continue in that role to do what is best for the people of this state.

STAFF: We'll take one more question.

MS. MADIGAN: Really? I was hoping we were done.

Q Can I follow up on this theme, though? Because you -- this is sort of like the cleansing hour. Did you have any conversations the past few days with your father about this, because he's the -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: I have spoken to all of the legislative leaders in the past few days and indicated to them that I believe that they should move forward with impeachment proceedings. In fact, this morning, I not only spoke with them all but I also sent them a letter, copies of which are floating around the room. And so I've spoken with them. I've sent them a letter. And I am hopeful that they will move forward with impeachment proceedings.

Q And all the conversations were relatively equal, even though one happened to be related to the -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: Correct.

Q Do you know why your father has been appearing to be somewhat reticent on the -- (off mike)?

MS. MADIGAN: You would have to ask the speaker questions about that.

Q The speaker of the house --

Q Do you know why the speaker of the house has appeared to be somewhat reticent --

MS. MADIGAN: I heard your question. You would need to ask him. (Laughter.)

Q (Off mike) -- just ask this. We've heard that there might have been a private citizen filed some papers.

MS. MADIGAN: I am unaware of any other filing, if that's what you're asking. Solicitor general?

MR. : I'm not aware of any.

MS. MADIGAN: We're not aware of any.

Q So if a private citizen were to go and file some of -- some of the things --

MS. MADIGAN: The Supreme Court of Illinois would determine what to do with those pleadings as well as they will determine what to do with ours.

Thank you all very much.

END.

8 Comments

i'd say that's a blindly opportunistic move. if it fails, what's her next act?

Why all the complications? The simple solution would be TAR AND FEATHERS AND RUN OUT OF STATE ON A RAIL!!

PULLING THE PLUG ON INSANITY!
LIKE JOE LOUIS SAID, YOU CAN RUN BUT YOU CAN'T
HIDE!
THE GUY SHOULD RESIGN AND PLEAD INSANITY BY
MENTAL DEFECT!
NO OLYMPICS!
NO PARDON FOR RYAN!
THE CIRCUS MAY NOT COME TO TOWN NEXT YEAR!
I'M SORRY THE CIRCUS IS IN TOWN!
IT JUST AIN'T RINGLING BROTHERS!
I HOPE THOSE MINISTERS DON'T END UP IN JAIL BY
GOING TO HIS HOUSE!
I HAVE A FEELING THE BUG IS STILL OPERATIONAL
AND UNDERWAY!
RAVENSWOOD WILL NEVER BE THE SAME!
NOW YOU KNOW WHY ALOT OF PEOPLE HAD NOTHING TO
DO WITH THIS GUY, ONE DID FLY OVER THE CUCKOO'S
NEST, JACK NICHOLSON JUST ISN'T PLAYING THE LEAD!
TINLEY PARK, OAK FOREST, MANTENO ARE IN PLAY!

Lisa is nothing more than a photo-op queen.But the brown haired Howdy Doody must go.

You don't say now ? Isn't kind of funny dat Rahm,Obama, Have them funny Terroist names. And yea know I can See Russia from my house. And Say isn't Emaunel that guy in that christmas song ? And all I gota say about that is "Marvick " !

Lisa you and your Speaker of Da House father hafe to be the two weakest minded people in power that I have ever heard of ! I mean come on honey you need supporting medical documents for your motion.

Lisa Madigan. Yet another wretched piece of political debris in the Illinois. How long has Lisa been in as AG of the state? And how many corruption charges has she brought against any politicians during her term of office? Finding corruption in Illinois should be like shooting fish in a barrel. Yet Lisa has found none. Now she stands in back of a podium, telling us she's the "Peoples Lawyer". What "People" might those be Lisa?

NOW IF SHE DIDN'T SPEAK, YOU WILL SAY SHE IS
PART OF THIS MESS, IF SHE SPEAKS SHE IS SEEKING
A PHOTO-OP, ARE YOU GUYS OKAY, YOU ARE GRASPING
AT STRAWS BIGTIME!
IF YOU DON'T LIKE HER FATHER, TELL HER FATHER,
SHE IS DOING A GREAT JOB, BUT YOU GUYS ARE STUCK
ON FOX NEWS, AND YOU WOULDN'T KNOW GREAT FROM
ADAMS HOUSE CAT!
WHY DON'T YOU LET THIS PLAY OUT, THE NICE LADY
HAS SAID SHE WANTS THE GUY TO RESIGN, SO RELAX
AND LET IT PLAY OUT, THE MAN AND HIS WIFE HAVE
BEEN GOING TO THE ATTORNEY'S OFFICE FOR ADVICE,
SO MAYBE MONDAY MIGHT BE THE DAY HE RESIGNS!
TO THOSE MEN WHO WERE OUTSIDE OF CONGRESSMAN
JACKSON'S HOME, GET A LIFE AND GROW UP, THAT WAS
DISGRACEFUL!
DID FOX NEWS SEND YOU OUT THERE, SOMEONE DID?
THEN I SEE YOU GUYS WITH ROLAND I'VE BEEN IN
MOTH BALLS BURRIS, THIS GUY IS TO OLD AND WAY
OUT OF HIS ELEMENT FOR THIS POSITION!
STOP ACTING LIKE STEPPING FETCHIT!
WE DON'T NEED TO ACT LIKE A SCENE FROM GONE WITH
THE WIND ANY LONGER!
THE GOP IS LAUGHING AT YOU GUYS!
DON'T FORGET WHAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN ON JAN 20TH!
I THINK YOU GUYS TOTALLY FORGOT ABOUT THIS SPECIAL
DAY, SO REMEMBER AND STOP ACTING LIKE YOU ARE IN
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN!
WE ARE DONE ACTING LIKE THIS, YOU SHOULD BE
ASHAMED OF YOURSELVES!
YOU DON'T HAVE ANY MONEY, YOUR SIGNS LOOKED BAD,
YOU LOOKED BAD, THE GOV IS AT THE CENTER OF THIS
MADNESS, SO TAKE A STEP BACK AND ACT LIKE
AMBASSADORS AND NOT SOME MINSTREL SHOW!
YOU GUYS NEED TO WATCH THE TUSKEGEE AIRMAN, THEY
ACTED LIKE REAL MEN!
WATCH THE BUFFALO SOLDIERS, JUST WATCH SOME
POSITIVE PEOPLE, PRESIDENT-ELECT OBAMA HAS DONE
A ONCE AND A LIFE TIME JOB, DON'T SPOIL IT, YOU
REALLY CAN'T BUT STOP ACTING SO POORLY!
CONGRESSMAN JACKSON JR. IS A CLASS-ACT!

Right. Ask the office to investigate corruption--you get a letter or two---then they say it's 'too old to pursue' and then YOU get harassed.

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Lynn Sweet

Lynn Sweet is a columnist and the Washington Bureau Chief for the Chicago Sun-Times.

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This page contains a single entry by Lynn Sweet published on December 12, 2008 2:00 PM.

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