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Republican National Committee research on what Obama has said about public campaign financing.

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FROM THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE.........


OBAMA VS. OBAMA ON PUBLIC FINANCING

After Supporting Public Financing When It Was In His Interest To Do So, Obama Now Claims System Is "Broken" And Opts Out For General Election

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Today, Barack Obama Announced He Will Opt Out Of The Public Financing System In The General Election:

Obama Has Declined Public Financing In The General Election, Calling It A "Broken System." "In a web video emailed to supporters, Obama asks his supporters to help him 'declare our independence from a broken system.' Of course, it's not so much a broken system that explains why he's passing on the FEC's $80+million. He will easily raise more than he could ever get in public funding." (Jonathan Martin, "Obama Opts Out Of Public Financing," The Politico's "Jonathan Martin" Blog, www.politico.com, 6/19/08)

FLASHBACK: Earlier In His Presidential Campaign, Obama Claimed To Support The Public Financing System:

"Mr. Obama Was The Candidate Who Proposed The [Public Financing] Pledge In The First Place, In February 2007, A Time When He Was Not Raising The Prodigious Sums He Is Now." (Elisabeth Bumiller, "Skirmishing By McCain And Obama On Financing," The New York Times, 2/15/08)

In April 2008, Obama Claimed He "Would Be Very Interested In Pursuing Public Financing..." Fox News' Chris Wallace: "If you can get that agreement, you would go for a publicly financed campaign?" Obama: "What I don't intend to do is to allow huge amounts of money to be spent by the RNC, the Republican National Committee, or by organizations like the Swift Boat organization, and just stand there without -- (cross talk)." Wallace: "But if you get that agreement?" Obama: "I would be very interested in pursuing public financing, because I think not every candidate is going to be able to do what I've done in this campaign, and I think it's important to think about future campaigns." (Fox New s' "Fox News Sunday," 4/27/08)

* Click Here To View

In Response To A 2007 Questionnaire, Obama Said He Would Accept Public Funding In General Election. Question: "If you are nominated for President in 2008 and your major opponents agree to forgo private funding in the general election campaign, will you participate in the presidential public financing system?" Obama: "Yes. I have been a long-time advocate for public financing of campaigns combined with free television and radio time as a way to reduce the influence of moneyed special interests." (Sen. Barack Obama, "Presidential Candidate Questionnaire," Midwest Democracy Network, www.commoncause.org, 11/27/07)

* Obama Even Referred To His Plan As A "Fundraising Pledge" For His Opponents To Accept. Obama: "In February 2007, I proposed a novel way to preserve the strength of the public financing system in the 2008 election. My proposal followed announcements by some presidential candidates that they would forgo public financing so they could raise unlimited funds in the general election. The Federal Election Commission ruled the proposal legal, and Senator John McCain (R-AZ) has already pledged to accept this fundraising pledge." (Sen. Barack Obama, "Presidential Candidate Questionnaire," Midwest Democracy Network, www.commoncause.org, 11/2 7/07)

The Washington Post: "When it was in Mr. Obama's interest to present himself as the ethical savior of an imperiled campaign finance system, he was happy to do so, especially since it didn't seem especially likely at the time that he'd be the nominee. But the real test of a candidate is whether he will stick by an announced principle even when that's against his own interest. Now Mr. Obama could become the first nominee since Watergate to run a campaign fueled entirely by private money." (Editorial, "A Lapsed Principle," The Washington Post, 3/14/08)

4 Comments

There will be many more FLASHBACKS to report. If one drinks the kool-aid, ones memory is faded and attention is affixed to the flavor of the day provided by the messiah. Oh what a true flashback in, Obama: "Yes. I have been a long-time advocate for public financing of campaigns combined with free television and radio time as a way to reduce the influence of moneyed special interests." Well, the great on can now claim his special interests are the "millions of the blind faithful" not special interest groups requiring something in return for their monetary support? Which of the 20+ year freinds and advisors will be tossed under the Obamabus next? Better make them take off their head scarf first, lest he be called a racist and anti-muslim

Mr. Obama = Mr. Spin This is just the begining of many spins coming from Obama. http://money.com OBAMA: NAFTA NOT SO BAD AFTER ALL In an interview with Fortune, Obama stated, "Sometimes during campaigns the rhetoric gets overheated and amplified". After he was reminded that he had called NAFTA "devastating" and "a big mistake". Listen up Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin and all you other blue collar states, this is the man you want for President.

No More Lobbyist!!!!!!

Senator Obama has said many times, "Lobbyist will not run my White House."

Getting rid of the extremely negative impact of lobbyist is one of the major reasons I support Senator Obama.

McCain has flip-flopped on many things. Yesterday he told the citizens of Missouri about a gas tax holiday he knows Congress will never approve.

Prior to McCain's event in Missouri yesterday, Democratic U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri said in a conference call that McCain's plan would cost the state 6,000 jobs and $167 million in federal gas tax dollars for Missouri's roadways.

"The people of Missouri can smell a phony deal a mile away," she said. "Frankly, that’s what John McCain’s gas tax is. He knew it wasn’t going to have any meaningful impact on people’s real pain – our dependence on foreign oil."

McCaskill said it was "a promise he knew he would never have to deliver on."

The "Could McCain Have Come Up with a More Ill-Suited Economic Advisor Than Phil Gramm?" is one of many examples for the damage caused by lobbyist specifically gas prices and the subprime housing damage.

http://www.alternet.org/election08/87999/?cID=936047#c936047

JP MICHIGAN-- if you wanna vote for McCain do so.
Personally, I don't know why anyone would even read anything from the republicans at this point. Haliburton, blackwater and before that stolen elections, anthrax for journalists publishing photos of drunk twins, you name it. You wanna side with the repugs, so be it.
Obama can't refuse campaign funds in the current environment. It's nice to see that he's going to do what Bill Clinton did--the first thing he proposed to congress was election reform legislation.
Woulda been nice if uncle teddy woulda brought Hillary clinton's health reform issue up for at VOTE in Congress--that might have been a great signal to the burgeoning Gingrich crap Bill had to fight off.
Oh well. Round 6.
We have a really good chance to win this thing in the Fall==and wouldn't that help Michigan more than a McCain win?

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Lynn Sweet

Lynn Sweet is a columnist and the Washington Bureau Chief for the Chicago Sun-Times.

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This page contains a single entry by Lynn Sweet published on June 19, 2008 10:00 AM.

McCain campaign says Obama opting out of public financng shows he is "just another typical politician." was the previous entry in this blog.

News organizations complain about being misled by Obama campaign. is the next entry in this blog.

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