Chicago Sun-Times
The scoop from Washington

Obama Latin America speech in Miami

| 14 Comments

EMBARGOED FOR DELIVERY
Renewing U.S. Leadership in the Americas
Remarks of Senator Barack Obama
Cuban American National Foundation
May 23, 2008
As prepared for delivery


It is my privilege to join in this week’s Independence Day celebration, and in honoring those who have stood up with courage and conviction for Cuban liberty. I’m going to take this opportunity to speak about Cuba, and also U.S. policy toward the Americas more broadly.

We meet here united in our unshakeable commitment to freedom. And it is fitting that we reaffirm that commitment here in Miami.

In many ways, Miami stands as a symbol of hope for what’s possible in the Americas. Miami’s promise of liberty and opportunity has drawn generations of immigrants to these shores, sometimes with nothing more than the clothes on their back. It was a similar hope that drew my own father across an ocean, in search of the same promise that our dreams need not be deferred because of who we are, what we look like, or where we come from.

Here, in Miami, that promise can join people together. We take common pride in a vibrant and diverse democracy, and a hard-earned prosperity. We find common pleasure in the crack of the bat, in the rhythms of our music, and the ease of voices shifting from Spanish or Creole or Portuguese to English.

These bonds are built on a foundation of shared history in our hemisphere. Colonized by empires, we share stories of liberation. Confronted by our own imperfections, we are joined in a desire to build a more perfect union. Rich in resources, we have yet to vanquish poverty.

What all of us strive for is freedom as FDR described it. Political freedom. Religious freedom. But also freedom from want, and freedom from fear. At our best, the United States has been a force for these four freedoms in the Americas. But if we’re honest with ourselves, we’ll acknowledge that at times we’ve failed to engage the people of the region with the respect owed to a partner.

When George Bush was elected, he held out the promise that this would change. He raised the hopes of the region that our engagement would be sustained instead of piecemeal. He called Mexico our most important bilateral relationship, and pledged to make Latin America a “fundamental commitment” of his presidency. It seemed that a new 21st century era had dawned.

Almost eight years later, those high hopes have been dashed.

Since the Bush Administration launched a misguided war in Iraq, its policy in the Americas has been negligent toward our friends, ineffective with our adversaries, disinterested in the challenges that matter in peoples’ lives, and incapable of advancing our interests in the region.

No wonder, then, that demagogues like Hugo Chavez have stepped into this vacuum. His predictable yet perilous mix of anti-American rhetoric, authoritarian government, and checkbook diplomacy offers the same false promise as the tried and failed ideologies of the past. But the United States is so alienated from the rest of the Americas that this stale vision has gone unchallenged, and has even made inroads from Bolivia to Nicaragua. And Chavez and his allies are not the only ones filling the vacuum. While the United States fails to address the changing realities in the Americas, others from Europe and Asia – notably China – have stepped up their own engagement. Iran has drawn closer to Venezuela, and just the other day Tehran and Caracas launched a joint bank with their windfall oil profits.

That is the record – the Bush record in Latin America – that John McCain has chosen to embrace. Senator McCain doesn’t talk about these trends in our hemisphere because he knows that it’s part of the broader Bush-McCain failure to address priorities beyond Iraq. The situation has changed in the Americas, but we’ve failed to change with it. Instead of engaging the people of the region, we’ve acted as if we can still dictate terms unilaterally. We have not offered a clear and comprehensive vision, backed up with strong diplomacy. We are failing to join the battle for hearts and minds. For far too long, Washington has engaged in outdated debates and stuck to tired blueprints on drugs and trade, on democracy and development -- even though they won’t meet the tests of the future.

The stakes could not be higher. It is time for us to recognize that the future security and prosperity of the United States is fundamentally tied to the future of the Americas. If we don’t turn away from the policies of the past, then we won’t be able to shape the future. The Bush Administration has offered no clear vision for this future, and neither has John McCain.

So we face a clear choice in this election. We can continue as a bystander, or we can lead the hemisphere into the 21st century. And when I am President of the United States, we will choose to lead.

It’s time for a new alliance of the Americas. After eight years of the failed policies of the past, we need new leadership for the future. After decades pressing for top-down reform, we need an agenda that advances democracy, security, and opportunity from the bottom up. So my policy towards the Americas will be guided by the simple principle that what’s good for the people of the Americas is good for the United States. That means measuring success not just through agreements among governments, but also through the hopes of the child in the favelas of Rio, the security for the policeman in Mexico City, and the answered cries of political prisoners heard from jails in Havana.

The first and most fundamental freedom that we must work for is political freedom. The United States must be a relentless advocate for democracy.

I grew up for a time in Indonesia. It was a society struggling to achieve meaningful democracy. Power could be undisguised and indiscriminate. Too often, power wore a uniform, and was unaccountable to the people. Some still had good reason to fear a knock on the door.

There is no place for this kind of tyranny in this hemisphere. There is no place for any darkness that would shut out the light of liberty. Here we must heed the words of Dr. King, written from his own jail cell: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

Throughout my entire life, there has been injustice in Cuba. Never, in my lifetime, have the people of Cuba known freedom. Never, in the lives of two generations of Cubans, have the people of Cuba known democracy. This is the terrible and tragic status quo that we have known for half a century – of elections that are anything but free or fair; of dissidents locked away in dark prison cells for the crime of speaking the truth. I won’t stand for this injustice, you won’t stand for this injustice, and together we will stand up for freedom in Cuba.

Now I know what the easy thing is to do for American politicians. Every four years, they come down to Miami, they talk tough, they go back to Washington, and nothing changes in Cuba. That’s what John McCain did the other day. He joined the parade of politicians who make the same empty promises year after year, decade after decade. Instead of offering a strategy for change, he chose to distort my position, embrace George Bush’s, and continue a policy that’s done nothing to advance freedom for the Cuban people. That’s the political posture that John McCain has chosen, and all it shows is that you can’t take his so-called straight talk seriously.

My policy toward Cuba will be guided by one word: Libertad. And the road to freedom for all Cubans must begin with justice for Cuba’s political prisoners, the rights of free speech, a free press and freedom of assembly; and it must lead to elections that are free and fair.

Now let me be clear. John McCain’s been going around the country talking about how much I want to meet with Raul Castro, as if I’m looking for a social gathering. That’s never what I’ve said, and John McCain knows it. After eight years of the disastrous policies of George Bush, it is time to pursue direct diplomacy, with friend and foe alike, without preconditions. There will be careful preparation. We will set a clear agenda. And as President, I would be willing to lead that diplomacy at a time and place of my choosing, but only when we have an opportunity to advance the interests of the United States, and to advance the cause of freedom for the Cuban people.

I will never, ever, compromise the cause of liberty. And unlike John McCain, I would never, ever, rule out a course of action that could advance the cause of liberty. We’ve heard enough empty promises from politicians like George Bush and John McCain. I will turn the page.

It’s time for more than tough talk that never yields results. It’s time for a new strategy. There are no better ambassadors for freedom than Cuban Americans. That’s why I will immediately allow unlimited family travel and remittances to the island. It’s time to let Cuban Americans see their mothers and fathers, their sisters and brothers. It’s time to let Cuban American money make their families less dependent upon the Castro regime.

I will maintain the embargo. It provides us with the leverage to present the regime with a clear choice: if you take significant steps toward democracy, beginning with the freeing of all political prisoners, we will take steps to begin normalizing relations. That’s the way to bring about real change in Cuba – through strong, smart and principled diplomacy.

And we know that freedom across our hemisphere must go beyond elections. In Venezuela, Hugo Chavez is a democratically elected leader. But we also know that he does not govern democratically. He talks of the people, but his actions just serve his own power. Yet the Bush Administration's blustery condemnations and clumsy attempts to undermine Chavez have only strengthened his hand.

We’ve heard plenty of talk about democracy from George Bush, but we need steady action. We must put forward a vision of democracy that goes beyond the ballot box. We should increase our support for strong legislatures, independent judiciaries, free press, vibrant civil society, honest police forces, religious freedom, and the rule of law. That is how we can support democracy that is strong and sustainable not just on an election day, but in the day to day lives of the people of the Americas.

That is what is so badly needed – not just in Cuba and Venezuela – but just to our southeast in Haiti as well. The Haitian people have suffered too long under governments that cared more about their own power than their peoples’ progress and prosperity. It’s time to press Haiti’s leaders to bridge the divides between them. And it’s time to invest in the economic development that must underpin the security that the Haitian people lack. And that is why the second part of my agenda will be advancing freedom from fear in the Americas.

For too many people in our hemisphere, security is absent from their daily lives. And for far too long, Washington has been trapped in a conventional thinking about Latin America and the Caribbean. From the right, we hear about violent insurgents. From the left, we hear about paramilitaries. This is the predictable debate that seems frozen in time from the 1980s. You’re either soft on Communism or soft on death squads. And it has more to do with the politics of Washington than beating back the perils that so many people face in the Americas.

The person living in fear of violence doesn’t care if they’re threatened by a right-wing paramilitary or a left-wing terrorist; they don’t care if they’re being threatened by a drug cartel or a corrupt police force. They just care that they’re being threatened, and that their families can’t live and work in peace. That is why there will never be true security unless we focus our efforts on targeting every source of fear in the Americas. That’s what I’ll do as President of the United States.

For the people of Colombia – who have suffered at the hands of killers of every sort – that means battling all sources of violence. When I am President, we will continue the Andean Counter-Drug Program, and update it to meet evolving challenges. We will fully support Colombia’s fight against the FARC. We’ll work with the government to end the reign of terror from right wing paramilitaries. We will support Colombia’s right to strike terrorists who seek safe-haven across its borders. And we will shine a light on any support for the FARC that comes from neighboring governments. This behavior must be exposed to international condemnation, regional isolation, and – if need be – strong sanctions. It must not stand.

We must also make clear our support for labor rights, and human rights, and that means meaningful support for Colombia’s democratic institutions. We’ve neglected this support – especially for the rule of law – for far too long. In every country in our hemisphere – including our own – governments must develop the tools to protect their people.

Because if we’ve learned anything in our history in the Americas, it’s that true security cannot come from force alone. Not as long as there are towns in Mexico where drug kingpins are more powerful than judges. Not as long as there are children who grow up afraid of the police. Not as long as drugs and gangs move north across our border, while guns and cash move south in return.

This nexus is a danger to every country in the region – including our own. Thousands of Central American gang members have been arrested across the United States, including here in south Florida. There are national emergencies facing Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras. Mexican drug cartels are terrorizing cities and towns. President Calderon was right to say that enough is enough. We must support Mexico’s effort to crack down. But we must stand for more than force – we must support the rule of law from the bottom up. That means more investments in prevention and prosecutors; in community policing and an independent judiciary.

I agree with my friend, Senator Dick Lugar – the Merida Initiative does not invest enough in Central America, where much of the trafficking and gang activity begins. And we must press further south as well. It’s time to work together to find the best practices that work across the hemisphere, and to tailor approaches to fit each country. That’s why I will direct my Attorney General and Secretary of Homeland Security to sit down with all their counterparts in the Americas during my first year in office. We’ll strive for unity of effort. We’ll provide the resources, and ask that every country do the same. And we’ll tie our support to clear benchmarks for drug seizures, corruption prosecutions, crime reduction, and kingpins busted.

We have to do our part. And that is why a core part of this effort will be a northbound-southbound strategy. We need tougher border security, and a renewed focus on busting up gangs and traffickers crossing our border. But we must address the material heading south as well. As President, I’ll make it clear that we’re coming after the guns, we’re coming after the money laundering, and we’re coming after the vehicles that enable this crime. And we’ll crack down on the demand for drugs in our own communities, and restore funding for drug task forces and the COPS program. We must win the fights on our own streets if we’re going to secure the region.

The third part of my agenda is advancing freedom from want, because there is much that we can do to advance opportunity for the people of the Americas.

That begins with understanding what’s changed in Latin America, and what hasn’t. Enormous wealth has been created, and financial markets are far stronger than a decade ago. Brazil’s economy has grown by leaps and bounds, and perhaps the second richest person in the world is a Mexican. Yet while there has been great economic progress, there is still back-breaking inequality. Despite a growing middle class, 100 million people live on less than two dollars a day, and 40 percent of Latin Americans live in poverty. This feeds everything from drugs, to migration, to support for leaders that appeal to the poor without delivering on their promises.

That is why the United States must stand for growth in the Americas from the bottom up. That begins at home, with comprehensive immigration reform. That means securing our border and passing tough employer enforcement laws. It means bringing 12 million unauthorized immigrants out of the shadows. But it also means working with Mexico, Central America and others to support bottom up development to our south.

For two hundred years, the United States has made it clear that we won’t stand for foreign intervention in our hemisphere. But every day, all across the Americas, there is a different kind of struggle – not against foreign armies, but against the deadly threat of hunger and thirst, disease and despair. That is not a future that we have to accept – not for the child in Port au Prince or the family in the highlands of Peru. We can do better. We must do better.

We cannot ignore suffering to our south, nor stand for the globalization of the empty stomach. Responsibility rests with governments in the region, but we must do our part. I will substantially increase our aid to the Americas, and embrace the Millennium Development Goals of halving global poverty by 2015. We’ll target support to bottom-up growth through micro financing, vocational training, and small enterprise development. It’s time for the United States to once again be a beacon of hope and a helping hand.

Trade must be part of this solution. But I strongly reject the Bush-McCain view that any trade deal is a good deal. We cannot accept trade that enriches those at the top of the ladder while cutting out the rungs at the bottom. It’s time to understand that the goal of our trade policy must be trade that works for all people in all countries. Like Central America’s bishops, I opposed CAFTA because the needs of workers were not adequately addressed. I supported the Peru Free Trade Agreement because there were binding labor and environmental provisions. That’s the kind of trade we need – trade that lifts up workers, not just a corporate bottom line.

There’s nothing protectionist about demanding that trade spreads the benefits of globalization, instead of steering them to special interests while we short-change workers at home and abroad. If John McCain believes – as he said the other day – that 80 percent of Americans think we’re on the wrong track because we haven’t passed free trade with Colombia, then he’s totally out of touch with the American people. And if John McCain thinks that we can paper over our failure of leadership in the region by occasionally passing trade deals with friendly governments, then he’s out of touch with the people of the Americas.

And we have to look for ways to grow our economies and deepen integration beyond trade deals. That’s what China is doing right now, as they build bridges from Beijing to Brazil, and expand their investments across the region. If the United States does not step forward, we risk being left behind. And that is why we must seize a unique opportunity to lead the region toward a more secure and sustainable energy future.

All of us feel the impact of the global energy crisis. In the short-term, it means an ever-more expensive addiction to oil, which bankrolls petro-powered authoritarianism around the globe, and drives up the cost of everything from a tank of gas to dinner on the table. And in the long-term, few regions are more imperiled by the stronger storms, higher floodwaters, and devastating droughts that could come with global warming. Whole crops could disappear, putting the food supply at risk for hundreds of millions.

While we share this risk, we also share the resources to do something about it. That’s why I’ll bring together the countries of the region in a new Energy Partnership for the Americas. We need to go beyond bilateral agreements. We need a regional approach. Together, we can forge a path toward sustainable growth and clean energy.

Leadership must begin at home. That’s why I’ve proposed a cap and trade system to limit our carbon emissions and to invest in alternative sources of energy. We’ll allow industrial emitters to offset a portion of this cost by investing in low carbon energy projects in Latin America and the Caribbean. And we’ll increase research and development across the Americas in clean coal technology, in the next generation of sustainable biofuels not taken from food crops, and in wind and solar energy.

We’ll enlist the World Bank, the Organization of American States, and the Inter-American Development Bank to support these investments, and ensure that these projects enhance natural resources like land, wildlife, and rain forests. We’ll finally enforce environmental standards in our trade deals. We’ll establish a program for the Department of Energy and our laboratories to share technology with countries across the region. We’ll assess the opportunities and risks of nuclear power in the hemisphere by sitting down with Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Chile. And we’ll call on the American people to join this effort through an Energy Corps of engineers and scientists who will go abroad to help develop clean energy solutions.

This is the unique role that the United States can play. We can offer more than the tyranny of oil. We can learn from the progress made in a country like Brazil, while making the Americas a model for the world. We can offer leadership that serves the common prosperity and common security of the entire region.

This is the promise of FDR’s Four Freedoms that we must realize. But only if we recognize that in the 21st century, we cannot treat Latin America and the Caribbean as a junior partner, just as our neighbors to the south should reject the bombast of authoritarian bullies. An alliance of the Americas will only succeed if it is founded on a bedrock of mutual respect. It’s time to turn the page on the arrogance in Washington and the anti-Americanism across the region that stands in the way of progress. It’s time to listen to one another and to learn from one another.

To fulfill this promise, my Administration won’t wait six years to proclaim a “year of engagement.” We will pursue aggressive, principled, and sustained diplomacy in the Americas from Day One. I will reinstate a Special Envoy for the Americas in my White House who will work with my full support. But we’ll also expand the Foreign Service, and open more consulates in the neglected regions of the Americas. We’ll expand the Peace Corps, and ask more young Americans to go abroad to deepen the trust and the ties among our people.

And we must tap the vast resource of our own immigrant population to advance each part of our agenda. One of the troubling aspects of our recent politics has been the anti-immigrant sentiment that has flared up, and been exploited by politicians come election time. We need to understand that immigration – when done legally – is a source of strength for this country. Our diversity is a source of strength for this country. When we join together – black, white, Hispanic, Asian, and native American – there is nothing that we can’t accomplish. Todos somos Americanos!

Together, we can choose the future over the past.

At a time when our leadership has suffered, I have no doubts about whether we can succeed. If the United States makes its case; if we meet those who doubt us or deride us head-on; if we draw on our best tradition of standing up for those Four Freedoms – then we can shape our future instead of being shaped by it. We can renew our leadership in the hemisphere. We can win the support not just of governments, but of the people of the Americas. But only if we leave the bluster behind. Only if we are strong and steadfast; confident and consistent.

Jose Marti once wrote. “It is not enough to come to the defense of freedom with epic and intermittent efforts when it is threatened at moments that appear critical. Every moment is critical for the defense of freedom.”

Every moment is critical. And this must be our moment. Freedom. Opportunity. Dignity. These are not just the values of the United States – they are the values of the Americas. They were the cause of Washington’s infantry and Bolivar’s cavalry; of Marti’s pen and Hidalgo’s church bells.

That legacy is our inheritance. That must be our cause. And now must be the time that we turn the page to a new chapter in the story of the Americas.

###

14 Comments

Talk about hypocrisy !

This is the same Obama who endorsed Dorothey Tillman for re-election AFTER she had made that infamous rant on the City Council floor, "the Voting Rights Act pertains ONLY to African-Americans and not them Mexicans".

Barack needs to look into a mirror first before pointing-fingers at others.

I found this to be right on. Personally,I have always felt that, instead of us trading and partnering up to China with a free trade system that we should be doing it with those countries that are part of this continent! This speech is encouraging. I dont't care what side of the political fence you stand on. Why should we shut -out those in our "backyard" to appease those across the ocean?How can we justify trading and making China rich, ( a true communist nation,orchestrated by the PLA -the Peoples Liberation Army)and not forging a sincere effort to trade with Cuba? I think Obama's speech speaks volumes!! Those Latin American countries at our door are a potentially better asset to this country than China!!! Our country and its corporations should have to be assisting and setting these countries up like we did with the Asian countries. Screw China!

SOUNDS LIKE A PRESIDENTIAL SPEECH TO ME!
BARACK OBAMA CAN HELP YOU RE-CONNECT WITH YOUR FORMER HOMELAND!


Senator Obama is the “media’s” nominee, not the masses of American voters

Senator Obama is not electable. He has become the “front runner” of this Democratic race by unimaginable tactics. He has misled and deceived millions of Americans and they are fully aware of it.

Obama’s connections with his pastor and other radical, leaders affiliated with his church were not unveiled until just a few months ago. The media is making light of these matters but they are certainly haunting millions of American voters.

Senator Obama has hidden his relationship with Reverend Wright, Trinity United Church of Christ’s support for Louis Farrakhan, Anton Rezko, William Ayers, Black Liberation Theology and Trinity United Church of Christ since the beginning of the primary. Until recently Senator Obama was an unknown.

Now that Americans are learning about him many have a change of heart about his values. According to many voters in my community, if they knew what they know now, they would never have voted for him in the earlier primary season.

The second and most important issue that has disturbed Democrats is that Senator Obama interfered with the seating process of Florida and Michigan. Almost 300 delegates have still not been seated. Senator Obama is deliberately postponing the process in order to exaggerate his lead to Americans and to the superdelegates. This misconception is so unfair for these states and to Clinton supporters.

For Senetor Obma not to address this issues has been a wake up call to many voters. There is a question as to why he would avoid this issue. He is not working for Democracy, he is trying to get elected. He is helping Obama, not the voters. Senator Clinton has tried to have these states do a revote for months.

Superdelegates and Americans keep viewing maps and numbers with only 48 states and the number 2026 as the total amount of delegates needed to become the Democratic nominee. These maps and math are convincing superdelegates that Obama is in the lead. There are 50 states in our country . Obama has deliberately suggested that the total amount of delegates should not include these two states.

Additionallly, Obama is not “closing the deal” in swing states, not winning the white popular vote,white lunch bucket voters, women voters, Cuban voters,Jewish voters and Latinos.

African Americans and the elite are not going to give him the majority of the voters needed to win the White House.

Lastly and something that needs to be evaluated more than another issue is the honesty about the race issue. There will never be a fair and accurate poll conducted to know how people will really vote for Obama.

Polls on CNN, May 20 2008, reported that 2/3 of Clinton supporters will not vote for Senator Obama but instead would vote Republican.

Seventy percent of Obama supporters will vote for Clinton.. Do the Democrats really want to hope whites vote for blacks? Maybe they will, maybe they won’t. This one factor alone would make Senator Obama a“long shot”.

Wake up Democrats. We can not and will not win this election unless we run from Obama and start supporting the Clintons. Please do not miss this opportunity Democrats. Let’s win this election with one that knows the ropes and will beat McCain.

Senator Clinton has experience, has the popular vote and can win the most important states. She’ll be ready the day she gets in office. These are facts and true statements from the “silent” voices of my community.

These remarks may be blunt. However, all issues have to be addressed to win against John McCain.

CNN) -- Two-thirds of Hillary Clinton's supporters in Kentucky say they would vote Republican or not vote at all rather than for Barack Obama, exit polls show.


You will maintain the embargo, Barack Obama--WHY?
JUST TO CYNICALLY GET REPUBLICANS TO CROSS OVER AND VOTE FOR YOU SHOULD THERE BE A REVOTE IN FLORIDA?
THE EMBARGO BLINDED PEOPLE IN CUBA.

Any person who thinks they are 'left' or humanitarian in nature cannot go along with this stated strategy.

SOUNDS LIKE A BUSH WANNA BE TO ME!!!!1

Yes Obama gets my vote on Cuba. I lived in the US the years of the cuban crises (I was 10 years of age). Years later when I analysed the embargo, I gave my full support to the actions taken by Kennedy; why? communism, the USSR. This ended in 1989; right now Chavez and other forces are to blame. Why does not the US apply the Monroe Doctrine? A possible answer; oil.

Thanks

YOU WANT TO MUCH FROM THE FUTURE PRESIDENT, LET HIM GET ELECTED
FIRST, THEN HE CAN TALK ABOUT THE EMBARGO SITUATION IN CUBA, MORE
SPECIFICALLY!
THIS MAN IS GOING TO REACH OUT TO LEADERS, INSTEAD OF PUTTING
LABELS ON VARIOUS LEADERS, LIKE BUSH DID, THE AXIS OF EVIL,
REMEMBER THAT COMMENT, NOW WE ARE SENDING FOOD TO NORTH KOREA,
OBAMA WILL THINK BEFORE HE ACTS, THAT WILL BE SOMETHING NEW IN
THE WHITE HOUSE!
THAT'S WHY WE DON'T NEED A THIRD TERM OF GEORGE BUSH, AKA MCCAIN!
BARACK OBAMA IS THE MAN WITH THE CORRECT PLAN!

Tell me how is it that Sen. Obama's and Sen. Clinton's platforms are so similar to each others, while both of their's differs so drastically from Sen. McCain's, but a huge percentage of Clinton supporters say they would rather vote for McCain than Obama in the general election?

The major difference between Clinton and obama is that she is white and he is black which means a lot of her supporters are basing their decision on race and I think Sen. Clinton shoulders a huge chunk of responsibility for this because of the type of election that she has run. She has tried to turn it into the white candidate against the black candidate and personally it sickens me.

As someone who already dislikes politics, it turns my stomach every time I watch CNN and they are pointing out the cities with a majority of white voters and noting that they will support Clinton or Black voters who will support Obama. Don't tell me this is not about race when so many people are clearly making a decision based solely on this!

People let's get back to making our decision based on the candidate that is right for our United States. I personally want someone in the White House who is truely willing to do what it takes to make this country better. If that means setting old grudges aside & sitting down with our enemies, then so be it. Maybe a better understanding can come out of those meetings and some of those enemies can become allies. If that means helping our neighbors to the south so we have less illegal immigration and less drug trafficking, then I'm for that too.

I was born in another country, but I love this country as if it were the only home I've ever known. I've served in our military and would gladly serve again if we were truely fighting for the right cause.

I hope Americans (born or naturalized) understand that we don't need someone in the Oval Office to continue the policies that Bush as been responsible for (like McCain would), and vote for Obama when he does win the nomination.

Anonymous, sweetie--it's because we don't find him TRUSTWORTHY.
He and Michelle began by being sexist piggies to Hill,
and then we began learning about all the times he SOLD OUT:
public housing to Rezko all the while trashing Hillary's service as
First Lady as somehow not counting;
handgun control voted present--mocked Hillary's pro hunting stance;
voted for Dick Cheney's 2005 pro nuke/GE/MSNBCLOVESIT energy 'policy'
keeps voting for the war while trashing Hillary over the NON ISSUE of
voting for the war--only 6 people could vote against it.
He bashes our only remaining HOPE of beating McCain instead of Bush--and when he goes after Bush--he only does it to make it seem like Hillary's outta da race.

I agree Senator McCain’s view of the Americas is out of touch, but so is telling CANF, sons of forces ousted from Cuba for crimes against humanity, that theirs is a legacy of conviction, commitment to freedom, and hard-earned prosperity.
Obama’s message of freedom must first stand the constitutional test in Miami.
Obama spoke of freedom from fear, leaving out acts of terrorism perpetrated with absolute impunity against the people of Cuba; financed by CANF (by convicted terrorist Posada Carriles’s own account to the New York Times), costing more than 3,000 lives, and countless suffering.
The Senator spoke of dissidents treated unfairly, yet this very week Cuba has put forth irrefutable evidence of convicted terrorists from South Florida sending those “dissidents” hefty contributions through the US Interest Section in Havana. That was a missed golden opportunity to attack the duality of Bush’s bogus war on terror.
Obama said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. Five Cuban political prisoners languish in US federal prisons for infiltrating organizations in Miami such as CANF, in order to avert acts of terrorism. They were unfairly tried in Miami and sentenced from 15 years to 2 consecutive life terms. This Administration continues to deprive them of basic human rights, while politicizing their case and squandering resources, in order to appease those applauding you in Miami.
Obama vowed to be a relentless advocate for democracy, but like Bush and McCain failed to define it, preferring instead to speak to fascists about Roosevelt’s speech on the Nazis.
He called Hugo Chavez a demagogue. Yet, while Exxon makes record profits, Chavez sells natural gas to the poorest in our country at modest prices. Maybe you shouldn’t spend too much time with extremists in Miami.
Obama spoke of freedom from fear in the America of Marti. Yet it was US meddlesome policies and expansionism that Marti taught us to fear the most.
Senator Obama, while you are forced to raise millions of dollars to run for public office, Cubans can run for public office for free. While you promise to make health insurance available to all, Cubans enjoy one of the best healthcare systems on the planet, for free. While you promise to make college loans available, Cubans enjoy free education.
When I look at the coffee mug with your photo on it at work next week, I’ll blush.

Chronology of terror
http://www.granma.cubaweb.cu/miami5/terrorismo/cronologia/index.html

If this isn't a wake up call to people who think this guy is 'left'===I dunno what IS.

I thought this speech was rather centrist by US standards. Which means right wing in terms of world standards. I only hope that he actually wants to completely reform or repeal existing Free Trade agreements so as to level the playing field and end drug cartels by ending the war on drugs and to talk to and work with the leftist leaders "from Bolivia to Nicaragua". The leader of these countries have gained legitimacy not from emulating Hugo Chavez, but from leading past fights against US caused injustice in the current Drug War and the covert Central American wars of the the 80's respectively.

SENATOR OBAMA,PLEASE LET AMERICA KNOW YOUR FEELINGS ON THIS US JUDICIAL INJUSTICE ???


***LETS ALL HOPE OUR INTERNATIONAL MEDIA FRIENDS ALSO SHOW AN INTEREST IN REPORTING ON THIS AMERICAN HORROR FACING THESE (TENS OF THOUSANDS) FORGOTTEN AND TRAPPED POORER AMERICANS, AND HOW THIS POSSIBLE FUTURE PRESIDENTIAL CONTENDER HANDLES THIS VERY SERIOUS ISSUE FACING AMERICA'S LATINO AND BLACK AMERICAN COMMUNITIES ????

**WITH 80% OF THE BLACK AMERICAN VOTERS SAYING THEY SUPPORT SENATOR OBAMA IN THIS PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, IT IS ONLY FAIR FOR EVERYONE TO KNOW PRIOR BEING ELECTED OUR NEXT PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES HOW THIS DEMOCRATIC SENATOR TRULY FEELS ABOUT THIS AMERICAN JUDICIAL HORROR CONTINUING TO INFLICT GRAVE HARM ON THE BLACK AMERICAN FAMILIES AND THEIR COMMUNITIES NATIONWIDE ??????

*** WHEN GOD’S FACE BECAME VERY RED ***
THE US SUPREME COURT GAVE ENEMY COMBATANTS FEDERAL APPEAL HC RIGHTS LAWYERS AND PROPER ACCESS TO US FEDERAL COURTS,AND POORER AMERICANS (MANY EVEN ON DEATH ROW) ARE DENIED PROPER FEDERAL APPEAL LEGAL REPRESENTATION TO OUR US FEDERAL COURTS OF APPEAL, AND ROTTING IN AMERICAN PRISONS NATIONWIDE ?????????

**** INNOCENT AMERICANS ARE DENIED REAL HC RIGHTS WITH THEIR FEDERAL APPEALS !
THE AMERICAN PEOPLE ARE $LOWLY FINDING OUT HOW EA$Y IT I$ FOR MIDDLE CLA$$ AND WORKING POOR AMERICAN$ TO FALL VICTIM TO OUR U$ MONETARY JUDICIAL $Y$TEM.

****WHEN THE US INNOCENT WERE ABANDONED BY THE GUILTY ****
The prison experts have reported that there are 100,000 innocent Americans currently being falsely imprisoned along with the 2,300,000 total US prison population nationwide.

Since our US Congress has never afforded poor prison inmates federal appeal legal counsel for their federal retrials,they have effectively closed the doors on these tens of thousands of innocent citizens ever being capable of possibly exonerating themselves to regain their freedom through being granted new retrials.

This same exact unjust situation was happening in our Southern States when poor and mostly uneducated Black Americans were being falsely imprisoned for endless decades without the needed educational skills to properly submit their own written federal trial appeals.

This devious and deceptive judicial process of making our poor and innocent prison inmates formulate and write their own federal appeal legal cases for possible retrials on their state criminal cases,is still in effect today even though everyone in our US judicial system knows that without proper legal representation, these tens of thousands of innocent prison inmates will be denied their rightful opportunities of ever being granted new trials from our federal appeal judges!!

Sadly, the true US *legal* Federal Appeal situation that occurs when any of our uneducated American prison inmates are forced to attempt to submit their own written Federal Appeals (from our prisons nationwide) without the assistance of proper legal counsel, is that they all are in reality being denied their legitimate rights for Habeas Corpus and will win any future Supreme Court Case concerning this injustice!

For our judicial system and our US Congressional Leaders Of The Free World to continue to pretend that this is a real and fair opportunity for our American Middle Class and Working Poor Citizens, only delays the very needed future change of Federal Financing of all these Federal appeals becoming a normal formula of Our American judicial system.

It was not so very long ago that Public Defenders became a Reality in this country.Prior that legal reality taking place, their were also some who thought giving anyone charged with a crime a free lawyer was a waste of taxpayers $$.

This FACADE and HORROR of our Federal Appeal proce$$ is not worthy of the Greatest Country In The World!

***GREAT SOCIETIES THAT DO NOT PROTECT EVEN THEIR INNOCENT, BECOME THE GUILTY!

A MUST READ ABOUT AMERICAN INJUSTICE:
1) YAHOO AND 2) GOOGLE
MANNY GONZALES THE KID THAT EVERYONE FORGOT IN THE CA PRISON SYSTEM.
** A JUDICIAL RIDE OF ONES LIFE !

lawyersforpooramericans@yahoo.com (424-247-2013)

Senator McCain this week action said to me that Senator Martinez is to much of something, to be his V.President.
It were only this pass Jan.2008 that Senator McCain was losing his Presidential race.
He came to tampa Fl. and got Senator Martinez support to push him forward to be were he is today. Now Senator Martinez serve as two term office as Orange County commissional . Central Florida is boomming.Senator Martinez serve as Hud Director ,more people have home today,than any time in america history,chech it for yourself it true.What wrong with a cuban Vice President.

Leave a comment

Get the Sweet widget

More widgets

Video

Lynn Sweet

Lynn Sweet is a columnist and the Washington Bureau Chief for the Chicago Sun-Times.

Stay in touch

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Lynn Sweet published on May 23, 2008 1:19 PM.

McCain's medical records was the previous entry in this blog.

Obama says will have to pick vice president "quickly' once votes are over. Transcript is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.