Kids re-enacting 'Scarface' is all a publicity stunt, not school play

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Watch that video, filled with kids 7- to 10-years old, re-enacting one of the foulest, most violent and most iconic gangster movies ever made. Think about that as you watch the original, thoroughly NSFW final scene from "Scarface" as Al Pacino dies spectacularly in a cocaine-fueled firefight:

The kids' re-enactment of Tony Montana's death scene is the rage of the Internet this week, a legitimate viral video promising the last bits of a school play gone horribly wrong. Cue the outrage, parental anger and rolling heads of the drama club sponsor who allowed this to happen, right?

Well, not so fast. You can keep the fires of your outrage stoked, but know that this is a hoax. OK, maybe not a full-on, man landed on the moon type hoax. But it's no school play. Turns out it's just a glorious act of self promotion on the behalf of director Marc Klasfeld. He's been behind the lens of videos by Jay-Z, Avril Lavigne and even was a driving force behind Lady Gaga's "Pokerface" video via his Rock Hard films production company.

So, of course, his next step in the creative ladder was to make a sensational bit of child exploitation under the cover of the deep well of creativity the Internet opens to filmmakers, right?

Ahh, the classic Hollywood tale.

"It's a rare place where you can be creative and express yourself freely and it's a very democratic process," Klasfeld told the L.A. Times. "It was a lot of fun."

This is not Klasfeld's first brush with the elusive viral video pursuit, but his Hammer Pants flashmob effort was considerably less, umm, what's the word ... douchey.

To take the over-the-top film even further past the top, Klasfeld doesn't see why setting young kids up to play the title roles in a drug-induced murder scene is all the big a fudging deal. After all, he's a sensitive parent who tries to keep his child from the horrific commercials he sees on TV:

"Everyday when I wake up with my daughter and I turn on the television for her and we're constantly guarding her against all these unnecessary sexual [messages] bombarding her ... so for us to see the reaction against this, well, that was a little shocking."

Klasfeld goes on in this interview to explain to CNN's Headline News Network why this is all just art and since all the kids and parents were OK with the process, he doesn't see what the big fudging stink being created is all about:

No word on what his next project will be, but you can almost hear some Mark Wahlberg dialogue from "The Departed" or maybe the final revenge scene when Clint Eastwood deals with Gene Hackman in "The Unforgiven" performed by a pre-kindergarten class being spooled up in his head. Or maybe those aren't sensational enough to grab the public eye again for this boundary-pusher.

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    This page contains a single entry by Craig Newman published on March 31, 2010 4:59 PM.

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