By Michael O'Brien

Who exactly voted for four classes?

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Joe Henrickson of the City/Suburban Hoops Report sets the record straight...

From Henrickson's blog:

If I hear one more time, just one more quote coming out of the IHSA saying "this is what the membership wanted," I am going to lose it. What in the world are they basing this on? Is it the ridiculous survey the IHSA sent out to schools around the state with many other topics and questions packed into the very same survey? Is it that same survey that only 38 percent of the roughly 800 IHSA member schools responded to?

This has been pointed out time and time again by the Hoops Report. And it will continue to be pointed out as long as statements like "this is what the membership wanted" are spewed out of the mouths of the people that, deep down, want four classes. Think about it. If we're talking 38 percent of 800 that is right around 300 schools that responded.

Of the 38 percent that did respond, 64 percent of those schools (64 percent of 300 schools) voted in favor of expanding to four classes. That means that of the roughly 800 member schools in this state, right around 192 of them were definitively in favor of expanding from two to four classes. That is less than 25 percent of the schools! So how can we be so positively sure that "this is what the membership wanted?"

Check out Henrickson's entire post here: http://citysuburbanhoopsreport.blogspot.com/2007/03/four-class-hard-feelings-wont-go-away.html

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6 Comments

Upon checking and reviewing what has happen in other states regarding classes of basketball it seems to me that nothing was wrong with the two class. But it did not make any money so with 4 classes the IHSA beleives it can make more. This matter is all about money!!!!! Not players or schools. Why does not the IHSA just say all players in basketball can just play AAU. Now we all know thats run by the shoe companies. That also relates to MONEY

If schools don't choose to respond, they have no one to blame but themselves. Quit whining.

Whoever voted for it needs to look at Indiana and see its destroyed the joy of Indiana basketball.

We have 4 classes in Pa. and New Jersey and the talent is dluted. Our finals rarely produce good games and it's not like they're attracting bigger crowds. Last Sun., Jersey held their 4 public school titles. The afternoon doubleheader drew 6500 while the evening doubleheader drew around 1000. Any format that would put Proviso East and St.Joe's in differnet classes is reason enough that it's a bad idea.

It's just wrong, but most people seem not to care. But wait until two Chicagoland schools win 1A and 2A one year, and then there will be screaming about "that was not what we intended!!"

Personally, I could support three classes if it was based on PERFORMANCE and not strictly ATTENDANCE. Let a school such as Illinois Math & Science play in 1A, depsite their attendence. Make the schools of any size that we always see in the supersectionals go play in 3A. Get a multi-year RPI-like tool in place to figure it out.

But since we live in a culture where nobody wants to tell their children "sorry, you're just not good enough..." we're going to be stuck with four classes for the forseeable future.

Why not keep 2 classes with 2 Div. in class AA and 1 Div. in class A. For example, class AA-Div. 1 and AA-Div.2 and a regular Class A. The state's Catholic schools should get together and form their own league and leave the IHSA. It is a great organization but does a disservice to its private school members. How a school with an enrollement of 500 can be AA escapes me, regardless that they can draw from outside the city where located. I.P.P.S.A (Illinois Private and Parochial School Association) or something like that.

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This page contains a single entry by Michael O'Brien published on March 13, 2007 10:31 AM.

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