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Beware the "fiscal cliff."

That's the warning that's been sounded by politicians, the media, and taxpayers since summer, gaining full force the moment President Barack Obama won re-election. While the term has only recently become part of the national vernacular, the build-up to this pivotal economic decision has been building for many years. The Democrats have refused to cut spending entitlements and Obama wants to raise taxes on the top income brackets. The Republicans, led by conservative super-lobbyist Grover Norquist, refuse to raise taxes and are opposed to losing currently implemented tax breaks. Also at stake is the defense budget that Dems want to scale back with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan ending while Republicans are pushing back on any additional defense cuts.

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In the final days of the 2012 presidential campaign, President Obama called in favors from some of music's heaviest hitters, Jay-Z and Bruce Springsteen, to play some rallies for him. Whether these pop luminaries' presence alongside Obama had any direct effect on voting is unknown but it certainly didn't hurt. But the latest pop alignment for the president is the new hyperpopular boy-band One Direction. That's right: the president hasn't only eschewed good music, he's done it for a BRITISH boy band. Unamerican, indeed. As if the group hadn't done enough damage to our fragile nation by sullying the reputation of Drew Brees, now they'll return to the scene of one of Britain's greatest crimes against America (not including Madonna's accent) and sing for the President. To be fair, the President wants to invite the lads as a thank you to his daughters for their help on the campaign. But, still, I shudder. If Mitt Romney had won, he would have had the good sense to invite a true American patriot like Michael McDonald or, if he was feeling frisky, Toad The Wet Sprocket.

Like all of Facebook, I now weep for America.

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The Electoral College breakdown map, courtesy of C-SPAN.
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By Neil Steinberg

If you thought Tuesday you were voting for the presidential candidate of your choice, think again. Due to a historic quirk in the creation of the United States -- some old operating code, as it were -- American voters do not chose the president directly, but rather select electors to the Electoral College who do the actual selecting of the president.

It's a cumbersome system. Each state has the same number of electors as it has representatives in Congress --the House of Representatives and Senate combined. Illinois, for example, has 20 - down one after the last census. They can't be the elected officials themselves, however. In 48 of the states, whoever wins the popular vote also wins all the electors -- only Nebraska and Maine have a proportional system where electoral votes are divided up between the winner and loser.

The system is a relic of an age when travel was difficult and counting ballots even more problematic than it is today. The Founding Fathers wanted to make sure that numerous regional contenders didn't divide the nation.

Thus whoever wins 270 of the 538 available electoral votes will be inaugurated president on Jan. 20, 2013. But every four years there is talk of scrapping the Electoral College system, though it does have its defenders. Here are the main arguments, pro and con.

Reasons to get rid of it

  1. 1. A discrepancy between the number of voters and the number of electoral votes creates the possibility of losing the popular vote while winning the Electoral College. Three presidents have been elected on electoral votes while failing to win a majority of voters -- Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876, Benjamin Harrison in 1888, and George W. Bush in 2000 -- an outcome that undermines the faith Americans have in the legitimacy of the executive branch of government.
  2. 2. The Electoral College is inherently undemocratic, skewing significance toward smaller, more sparsely populated states. Delaware, with 900,000 residents, has three electoral votes, while Texas, with more than 25 million residents, has 34, which means from an electoral point of view, a vote in Delaware is more than twice as significant -- representing 1/300,000th of an electoral vote -- than a vote in Texas, representing 1/750,000 of an electoral vote.
  3. 3. By focusing on assembling 270 electoral votes, candidates ignore "safe" states such as Illinois, where there is no point in fighting for more votes once a majority is reached, since all the electoral votes are already assured. Thus the majority of states, nearly certain to fall one way or another, tend to get ignored in favor of a handful of "swing" states.
  4. 4. Even if the Electoral College works perfectly, it still introduces unnecessary delay into the system. Give the likelihood of immediate electronic voting in the foreseeable future, having to wait for some mysterious conclave to put its seal of approval on the will of the American people is unnecessary, not only wasting time, but wasting the money required to run the system.
  5. 5. There is the remote but real possibility of fraudulent electors -- members of the Electoral College who refuse to vote the way the results require that they vote. This has happened, and while it has never affected the outcome of a race, it could, and there is no reason to allow the possibility that one individual could perversely negate the will of hundreds of thousands of voters.

Reasons to keep it

  1. 1. America is change averse and would rather cling to an arcane system than switch to a new one, which might have flaws of its own. If we can't get rid of the penny, we can't scrap the Electoral College so why try? To do so, would involve a change in the constitution -- Article II, Section I lays out the details of the Electoral College -- and whatever benefit isn't worth the trouble of doing that.
  2. 2. Without the Electoral College, candidates would be encouraged to treat the country as a whole, and campaign through the national media, or in urban centers where the most people are concentrated. They would never spend time in a place like Ohio, where an evenly divided population means its electoral votes are up for grabs.
  3. 3. The Electoral College can soften the sting of tight races, which we often see. Thus a candidate who only wins by a tiny percentage of the popular vote can still have a considerable victory in the Electoral College, leading to a greater impression of consensus, which is good for subsequent governing.
  4. 4. The Electoral College helps direct power toward the states -- without it, authority would be even more centralized than it already is.
  5. 5. If the Electoral College wasn't scrapped after the debacle of the 2000 elections -- which saw one of those fraudulent electors -- it's never going to be.

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Two statuettes depicting President Barack Obama, left, and Republican rival Mitt Romney are backdropped by the Stars and Stripes in a shop which sells Christmas nativity figures in Naples, Italy, Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, hours ahead of their third and final presidential debate in Boca Raton, Florida. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta)


After a whirlwind three weeks that's seen just about everything we thought we could see in an election, the two major party candidates for President of the United States - Democratic incumbent Barack Obama and GOP candidate Mitt Romney - hold their final debate of the election season tonight. Going into the first debate less than three weeks ago in Denver, Obama was poised for a runaway win barring any major speed bumps. But that's what happend in Denver when Obama put forth a listless, lackluster performance by the president plus a new populist approach from Romney turned things around and put the wind at Romney's back, changing the entire course of the race. A testy, fiery Vice President Joe Biden turned up in the VP debate against GOP nominee Paul Ryan. And last week, Romney and Obama engaged in a heated, electrice debate, the candidates stalking the stage, often circling one another as they unleashed attacks on the other.

Tonight's moderator, CBS' Bob Schieffer, has experience with debates, having moderated one in each of the last two presidential election, and has already announced his list of topics for tonight's debate, centered on foreign policy:

  • America's role in the world
  • Our longest war - Afghanistan and Pakistan
  • Red Lines - Israel and Iran
  • The Changing Middle East and the New Face of Terrorism - I
  • The Changing Middle East and the New Face of Terrorism - II
  • The Rise of China and Tomorrow's World

Tonight should be a lively debate and we've got our best columnists and pundits along to provide live commentary. Below you can find both live video via YouTube of the debate and, below that, the running commentary from the Sun-Times staff. Before we go live at 7:30 p.m. and throughout the debate, take some time to check out some of our other posts about the upcoming election and check out even more coverage at our Election Page.

Bears or Debate? What are you watching?
Roeper: Presidential circus continues
Ghosts of Elections Past: Ohio and Florida
Sifting through presidential endorsements
Googling the next president
Mitt Romney and Barack Obama at last week's Alfred E. Smith dinner
Obama campaign rolls out new "Romnesia" stump speech
FiveThirtyEight's Nate Silver on The Daily Show

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It's been just shy of two weeks since President Obama gave a half-hearted showing in the first presidential debate against GOP challenger Mitt Romney. A listless president didn't challenge a fiery Romney in a debate that was further bogged down by a lackluster Jim Lehrer as moderator. The result? A huge swing for Romney who, in the days leading up to the debate, saw his deficit behind Obama swell. With the two candidates almost even, Obama got a small boost from Vice President Joe Biden who was seen by many pundits as besting GOP VP candidate Paul Ryan in last week's VP debate, but barely so. With Obama still holding a slight edge over Romney, at least according to FiveThirtyEight and RealClearPolitics, the incumbent is still looking to take the momentum back from Romney.

Tonight's debate should be an interesting one as it's a town-hall style forum and both campaigns have already gotten squirrelly over how tonight's moderator, CNN's Candy Crowley, will handle the questions and the candidates.

So to review: an incumbent aiming for an aggressive outing to change the rolling momentum of a fiesty challenger who's found his second wind answering questions from undecided voters with a wild card moderator. Should be a fun time so follow below as we live-blog the debate including insight from Sun-Times pundits and other bright minds. Also, sure to check out this pre-debate fact check.


BY FRAN SPIELMAN
City Hall Reporter
fspielman@suntimes.com

Mayor Rahm Emanuel warned Tuesday that the U.S. House Republican budget crafted by Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan could trigger a recession.

Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet reported the news of Paul Ryan's addition to the Mitt Romney ticket as the story unfolded late Friday and into Saturday. Here are her blog posts, tweets and photos through the day as the news developed and the Romney campaign hit the trail with a vice presidential candidate in the fold.

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Washington D.C. is seen from Air Force One, with President Barack Obama aboard, during a return flight early Friday morning. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)


In a week when negative campaigning picked up pace and seemed to start to sway the national presidential poll numbers, and following a couple of years of crumbling national discourse in politics in D.C., sometimes it pays to take a step back and a deep breath.


In this photo, the U.S. Capitol is seen in the middle of the image, an unusually peaceful oasis. The photo was taken from Air Force One as President Obama returned from a campaign trip to Colorado. Then he's back on the plane, headed for Chicago this weekend, reports Lynn Sweet.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle are on the fund-raising trail Sunday: Obama has four events in Chicago while Mrs Obama is looking for campaign cash in Los Angeles.

My post with the details is HERE.

WASHINGTON--This has been an ugly week in the presidential campaign--defined in part by hard-hitting ads produced to help re-elect President Barack Obama and to bolster Mitt Romney. The very big problem: each of these ads are deeply misleading, concludes FactCheck.org after an extensive analysis.

The findings from FactCheck.org:

Obama ally Priorities USA wrong to blame Mitt for cancer death
FactCheck.org analyzed a spot by Priorities USA, the pro-Obama SuperPac and concludes the spot blaming Mitt Romney for the cancer death of a woman is misleading.

Mitt wrong in claiming Obama wants to "gut" welfare: FactCheck.org
The verdict is in from FactCheck.org: the Mitt Romney campaign claim that Obama wants to "gut welfare" is wrong.