Chicago Sun-Times
Staff reports on all things politics - from City Hall to Springfield to Washington, D.C.

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For Joe Berrios, the Cook County assessor who is also the county Democratic Party chairman, government is the family business. That got him in trouble with the county ethics board, which called for Berrios to fire three family members. But the Berrios family's presence on government payrolls extends beyond that, the Chicago Sun-Times found, with 13 family members now collecting a paycheck from the county or state, plus two more who recently retired and now get public pensions.

Dan Mihalopoulos has the whole report here.

Above, find the handy family tree created for the story by Sun-Times graphic guru Max Rust. Click the image to open the full-size version.

More election trends

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If you're just catching up after the election - and who could blame you for taking a break? - we've been swarmed with maps as to how the election broke down. There was the electoral map, the margin of victory, and even the makeup of red state voters and blue state voters. Now we have the above chart, via the Associated Press, which helps break down the demographics of the voters: men vs women, by race, and by age. It's an interesting set of data that underscores why Romney lost (alienating women and growing minorities).

Now that the election is over, let's take a look at the different parts of the country where each candidate won. Based on these two "new Americas", if we examine the latest American Community Survey data from 2010, we can see slight differences in particular demographics, such as education level, race and occupation. One of the most interesting results from this exercise is that in both Americas, government workers make up the same share of the working population.

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