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Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off of launch pad 39-A from the Kennedy Space Center January 16, 2003 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Columbia broke up upon re-entry to earth February 1, 2003. (Photo by Matt Stroshane/Getty Images)


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This image from a NASA handout video shows a close up of a piece of debris falling from the external tank, then striking the left wing of the Space Shuttle Columbia during launch on January 16, 2003. NASA officials noticed this piece of debris during lift off of Columbia, but did not consider it a major problem at the time. NASA Mission Control lost contact with the Space Shuttle Columbia during reentry on February 1, 2003 and later learned that the shuttle had broken up over Texas. Debris from the wreckage drifted hundreds of miles from central Texas to eastern Louisiana. Investigators are looking at problems with the left wing during the reentry sequence as a possible cause of the crash. (Photo by NASA/Getty Images)


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This NASA handout image shows the Space Shuttle Columbia during reentry as it passes over the Starfire Optical Range at Kirkland Air Force Base, New Mexico on February 1, 2003. Shuttle crash investigators have scrutinized this image which some believe shows damage to the left wing of the shuttle. NASA Mission Control lost contact with the Space Shuttle Columbia during the reentry phase of mission STS-107 on February 1, 2003 and later learned that the shuttle had broken up over Texas. Debris from the wreckage drifted hundreds of miles from central Texas to Louisiana. All seven astronauts onboard the Shuttle died in the crash. (Photo by NASA/Getty Images)


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In this Feb. 1, 2003 file photo, debris from the space shuttle Columbia streaks across the sky over Tyler, Texas. The Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. Ten years later, reminders of Columbia are everywhere, including up in the sky. Everything from asteroids, lunar craters and Martian hills, to schools, parks, streets and even an airport (Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport) bear the Columbia astronauts' names. Two years ago, a museum opened in Hemphill, Texas, where much of the Columbia wreckage rained down, dedicated to "remembering Columbia." About 84,000 pounds of that wreckage, representing 40 percent of NASA's oldest space shuttle, are stored at Kennedy and loaned for engineering research. (AP Photo/Scott Lieberman)


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This image from the National Weather Service shows a radar image of debris from the break up of the Space Shuttle Columbia (red streak below center) February 1, 2003 near Shreveport, Louisiana. NASA Mission Control lost contact with Columbia during re-entry on February 1, 2003 and later learned that the shuttle had broken up over Texas. Debris from the wreckage drifted hundreds of miles from central Texas to eastern Louisiana. (Photo by National Weather Service/Getty Images)


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In this Jan. 2003 file photo, astronaut Rick D. Husband, mission commander of the space shuttle Columbia, is pictured on the aft flight deck. Husband and six crew members were lost when Columbia broke up during re-entry over north Texas on Feb. 1, 2003. This picture was on a roll of unprocessed film recovered by searchers from the debris later, released by NASA on June 24, 2003. (AP Photo/NASA)


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In this handout photo from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the STS-107 crewmembers strike a flying pose for their traditional in-flight crew portrait in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module (RDM) aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia taken between January 16 and February 1, 2003 in space. From the left (bottom row), wearing red shirts to signify their shift?s color, are astronauts Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist; Rick D. Husband, mission commander; Laurel B. Clark, mission specialist; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist. From the left (top row), wearing blue shirts, are astronauts David M. Brown, mission specialist; William C. McCool, pilot; and Michael P. Anderson, payload commander. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency. On February 1, 2003, the seven crewmembers were lost with the Space Shuttle Columbia over North Texas. This picture was on a roll of unprocessed film later recovered by searchers from the debris. (Photo by NASA/Getty Images)


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Evelyn Husband-Thompson, center, widow of Colonel Rick Husband, space shuttle Columbia commander, speaks at a remembrance ceremony at the Space Mirror Memorial on the 10th anniversary of the loss of space shuttle Columbia crew at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, in Cape Canaveral, Fla..(AP Photo/John Raoux)


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Evelyn Husband-Thompson, left, widow of Colonel Rick Husband, space shuttle Columbia commander, speaks at a remembrance ceremony on the 10th anniversary of the loss of space shuttle Columbia crew at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. On the memorial, in upper left of photo, is the name of her late husband and the other astronauts that lost their lives in the accident.(AP Photo/John Raoux)


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Sandra Anderson, left, widow of astronaut Michael P.Anderson, and Evelyn Husband-Thompson, widow of Colonel Rick Husband, space shuttle Columbia commander, embrace in front of a memorial wreath during a remembrance ceremony on the 10th anniversary of the loss of space shuttle Columbia crew at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)


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A wreath placed at the Space Mirror Memorial is seen during a remembrance ceremony on the 10th anniversary of the loss of space shuttle Columbia crew at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Ten years ago, the space shuttle Columbia and its seven astronauts were lost. They were returning from a 16-day mission and were just 16 minutes from home when the shuttle disintegrated on Feb. 1, 2003. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

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