Chicago Sun-Times
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Jury's out in Sarno case and asks for Friday off

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In a possible indication that the jury expects its deliberations to last at least through part of next week, it has asked the judge in the Sarno case to have Friday off.

The jury got the case for a short time on Monday, and its first full day of deliberations was Tuesday, when it asked to have Christmas Eve off.

Given that the jury has a ton of evidence to consider against the five defendants, four of who are charged with one of most complicated laws for a jury to grapple with, racketeering conspiracy, it's not surprising that the jury will need some time to do its job.

Of course, keep in mind that a jury's questions or requests to the judge may indicate one outcome, and then the precise opposite one comes about.

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4 Comments

Wow ! The jury asked for Christmas Eve off and they came to a verdict on Wednesday?? Thats crazy..how can 12 different people with 12 differnt mindsets all come to a conclusion on 5 men in this VERY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME. Apparently they thought deliberations would take a little bit longer than 5 days if they had the intention of having Friday(christmas eve) off. This jury took the easy way out and put these innocent men in jail, how could they come to a verdict of a six week trial in less than 72 hours- they couldnt ! Now the families of these defendents have to celebrate the holiday's alone without there loved ones, while the jury has to live with the GUILT of putting innocent men away.

Apsolutley right. You put this very important trial to a bunch of antsy jurors right before Christmas? You seriously think that they're not going to come to a conclusion before the Holidays?
I know first hand that the jurors don't retain 30% of the whole trial. The bottom line is that they are the last ones that want to be in court. They don't give a crap as long as the trial is over quickly. The prosocuters know how to minipulate the jury.
If the defendents are guilty or not, the jury system needs to be changed.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Agree..i understand that the jury wants this long trial to be over, but i dont think they realize how important it truely was to read over the evidence and they must believe each and every piece of info beyond reasonable doubt..half of the jury was in TEARS ! obviously they werent 100% on their decision, they just went along with some of the other people in order to end before christmas and that is UNJUST! this was not a FAIR trial by any means. The judge should have asked the 5 members of the jury why they were intears.

It is apparent that the jury was under a tremendous amount of pressure from the U.S.
Government. The agents sat staring and smirking at the jurors for the entire 6 week trial. Remember the government sits in front of the jury box. The unfortunate thing about this case is that there seems to be some unsettling issues due to the jury. On Tuesday December 21, they had 2 questions. 1) can they be dismissed @4:15 on Thursday and 2) can they have Christmas Eve off. Evidently they were not going to be excused for Christmas Eve. With that said, they decided to return a guilty verdict. If that is not true, then why would one of the jurors come out hysterically crying? There a were 3 others on the jury that were very hesitant also. It is not humanly possible that a jury could reach a verdict within 72 hrs when there were 70 audio tapes, 158 Pages of jury instructions, and binders full of transcripts. Not to mention 5 separate trials going on at once. A very hard trial to follow. If anyone has a doubt about their decision then they should come forward to the judge. Clear your conscious.

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This page contains a single entry by Steven Warmbir published on December 22, 2010 9:59 AM.

Closing argument for Mark Polchan was the previous entry in this blog.

Jury note in Sarno case is the next entry in this blog.

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