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World record largemouth bass: IGFA receives documentation

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Late Monday, the International Game Fish Association received the application for the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), caught July 2, by Manabu Kurita, 32, of Aichi, Japan. It would tie fishing's most hallowed record.

PendingworldrecordbassfromJapan-33805-AG

Here are the details from the IGFA

IGFA receives documentation, photos on pending world record largemouth bass caught in Japan
Weight matches current IGFA record held for 77 years by Georgia's George Perry

DANIA BEACH, Fla. USA, (September 15, 2009) --- Documentation for a much talked about 22 lb 4 oz largemouth bass, caught from Japan's largest lake in July, has arrived into the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) headquarters for world record recognition.
Late Monday, the IGFA, the 70-year old non-profit fisheries conservation, education and record-keeping body, received the application for the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), caught July 2, by Manabu Kurita, 32, of Aichi, Japan. IGFA rules for fish caught outside the U.S. allows anglers 90 days to submit their applications from the date of their catch.
IGFA conservation director Jason Schratwieser said the World All-Tackle application is currently under review after it was received through the Japan Game Fish Association (JGFA).
Schratwieser said the application stated the bass weighed 10.12 kg (22 lbs 4 ozs) and was pulled from Lake Biwa an ancient reservoir northeast of Kyoto. Photos and video were also submitted with the written documentation.
Kurita's fish would tie the current record held for over 77 years by George Perry caught on Georgia's Montgomery Lake, June 2, 1932, near Jacksonville, Georgia.
In North America the largemouth bass, and especially the All-Tackle record, is considered by millions of anglers as the "holy grail" of freshwater fish because of its popularity and the longevity of Perry's record.
Largemouth bass have also been introduced in many countries and in Japan fisheries officials consider it an invasive species. In addition, because bass are not native and are stocked in Japan, many speculated that the big bass was a sterile triploid. However when biologists in Japan examined the ova of the big female they concluded that the fish was not triploid.
IGFA World Records Coordinator Becky Wright reported Kurita's fish measured 27.20 inches in length and an almost equal girth of 26.77 inches. She said Kurita was using a blue gill as live bait trolling through a canal.
A decision by the IGFA of whether Kurita's fish will tie Perry's record may take up to a month.
"We have a formal relationship with our sister organization, the Japan Game Fish Association where they first collect and review record applications for fish caught in Japan," said Schratwieser. "It works out well because they not only translate applications but can also contact the angler if more documentation is needed.
"We still have a number of questions to ask them and Kurita regarding local laws and the area he caught it in while he was trolling through a canal on the lake," said Schratwieser.
"We hope to make an announcement in three to four weeks."
Annually the IGFA publishes a comprehensive list of current records on nearly 1100 species of fresh and saltwater fish across the globe in its highly acclaimed World Record Game Fishes (WRGF) book which is divided into all-tackle, line classes, fly, and junior record categories.
The IGFA has been recognized as the official keeper of world saltwater fishing records since its founding in 1939. In 1978 it added the field of freshwater record-keeping when Field & Stream magazine transferred its 68 years of records to the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum, the association's world headquarters in Dania Beach, Fla.
The next edition of the IGFA World Record Game Fishes book will be released in early 2010 and is only available from the IGFA with a $40 annual IGFA membership. The membership also includes on-line access to the most current updated world records on the IGFA web site, six issues of the International Angler bi-monthly news magazine, unlimited admission to the IGFA's interactive Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Fla., plus much more.
To join, or to renew your IGFA membership, go on-line to www.igfa.org or call the IGFA headquarters at 954-927-2628.
The IGFA is a not-for-profit organization committed to the conservation of game fish and promotion of responsible, ethical angling practices through science, education, rule making and record keeping. IGFA members are located in over 125 countries and territories. The IGFA welcomes visitors to its interactive Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Florida. Its web site is www.igfa.org .

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5 Comments

The situation has changed.

There still has not been any ruling on the pending record bass caught by Mr. Kurita at Lake Biwa.

It has been half a year; usually records are either approved or disapproved within a couple of months at best.

A new Japanese Yellowtail record (over 100 pounds!) was caught on Oct. 24, 2009, and it has already been approved...


But yellowtail record submissions do not have all the politics that largemouth black bass record submissions do here in Japan.

One of my sources in the know tells me that there is no way the JGFA will allow the grand fish to become a new Japan record--

Caught up in politics...-dsc04276.jpg

especially since it comes from "catch and kill" (catch and release of bass is illegal) Biwa Lake.

Interestingly enough, the IGFA is an autonomous body, and is supposed to make decisions regardless of what other (ie. JGFA) organizations allow/disallow.


Yet the IGFA has not rendered a final decision on this fish.


Steve Mras, multiple IGFA WR holder, emailed me the following:


No decision yet on possible record bass caught in Japan


The IGFA is still waiting additional information before making a decision for world record recognition on a 22 lb 4 oz largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), caught by Manabu Kurita, 32, of Aichi, Japan, from that country’s largest lake July 2. IGFA conservation director Jason Schratwieser said the World All-Tackle application is still under review after it was received in mid-September through the Japan Game Fish Association (JGFA). “We’ve been corresponding with the angler via our sister organization, the JGFA,” said Schratwieser. Besides being a non-profit fisheries, education and conservation organization, the 70- year old IGFA has long been the world’s recognized record-keeping body for over 1100 salt and fresh water recreational fish species. Schratwieser said the bass weighing 10.12 kg (22 lb 4 oz) was pulled from Lake Biwa an ancient reservoir northeast of Kyoto. Photos and video were also submitted with Kurita’s written documentation. If approved Kurita’s fish would tie the current record held for over 77 years by George Perry caught on Georgia’s Montgomery Lake, June 2, 1932, near Jacksonville, Georgia. In North America the largemouth bass, and especially the All-Tackle record, is considered by millions of anglers as the “holy grail” of freshwater fish because of its popularity and the longevity of Perry’s record.


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Mr. Kurita has made a complete submission, with more info provided than many submissions that became records with no problem.

It makes one wonder what "additional information" the IGFA could be possibly be waiting for?

I have met Mr. Kurita several times in my tackle store in Aichi, Japan. He is an avid bass angler, with a passion for hunting big fish; it seems very unfortunate that such a fine catch that should bring so much controversy.

Nobody I talked to here can remember a JGFA record submission that has taken this long. I am not going to hold my breath on a ruling anytime soon.

http://delawaretrophybass.com

Largemouth bass in Japan? Gosh darn invasive exotic species!

Congratulations to Manabu Kurita. He is a true trophy hunter dedicated to the pursuit of world record bass like no other. I am proud to say that in the past year he has become one of my closest friends, Another person who helps him a great deal but receives no real credit is Reika Ishaguro who designs his website, communicates his thoughts and wishes to me and others, and also is a great angler in her own right. Manabu and Reika are good friends and you can talk with both of them at my website at Northeast Bass Fishing For Trophy Bass. http://delawaretrophybass.com
Tight lines, and best of luck to all trophy hunters the world over on the next world record. Steve Owner

Congratulations to Manabu Kurita...he now shares the official record...what a great feat!

I honestly think it is fitting it came from Japan and not California. Not because they deserve it more than the U.S. but it speaks volumes about the wits and character of such an elusive predator. It shows how truly adaptable and mysterious this predator still is. Even after being hunted by millions of fisherman spending billions of dollars (I am one of them) to catch this species the record pops up in such an unlikely local.

Congrats again!

BTW how much was that round trip flight to Japan again...and who is a great outfitter over there?

All the best!

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This page contains a single entry by Dale Bowman published on September 15, 2009 7:51 PM.

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