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Inside the Rod Blagojevich investigation and related cases

Blagojevich trial: Did the ex-governor commit crimes, or was it all talk?

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When you put aside the profanity-laced recordings, the $400,000 wardrobe and testimony that he was a no-show governor, much of the case remaining against Rod Blagojevich is a series of incomplete acts.

So as the prosecution's case against Blagojevich winds down to its final days this week, the question remains: Did Blagojevich commit crimes, or was it all just talk?

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Didn't they actually come down on him when he did because he was going to make a decision about the racetrack bill? I don't recall which issue it was, but I remember thinking that it wasn't the senate seat. I could be wrong though, please correct me.

The defense seems to keep trying to prove that Rod was the only one that didn't do anything illegal. Remember the discussion of the ethics quiz? Blag's people wrote that ethics quiz and Rod took it, so have I. There are parts in there, particularly in the version that came out soon after Ryan was sent to prison, that covered these exact crimes, the same crimes Ryan committed, pay to play, etc.

Regardless of how evil or encouraging his advisors might have been for him to break the law, he's the one that initiated a code of ethics for state employees. Saw the prior governor go to prison. Yet he still made the attempt. He ended up not benefitting because he just wasn't that good at shaking people down, and most of his staff wasn't that helpful. But he did try and he did know it was against the law. It doesn't matter if Greenlee or Harris or anyone else said these deals were legal, he is the governor, he's their boss and ultimately the responsibility falls to him for his actions.

The Fed came forward when they did because it really looked like he was going to succeed in pay to play for the senate seat. I really wonder what would have happened if he hadn't been stopped. In the end, he still expected Burris to raise funds for him too. He showed a pattern of illegal behavior in all of those solicitations.

The defense seems to keep trying to prove that Rod was the only one that didn't do anything illegal. Remember the discussion of the ethics quiz? Blag's people wrote that ethics quiz and Rod took it, so have I. There are parts in there, particularly in the version that came out soon after Ryan was sent to prison, that covered these exact crimes, the same crimes Ryan committed, pay to play, etc.

Regardless of how evil or encouraging his advisors might have been for him to break the law, he's the one that initiated a code of ethics for state employees. Saw the prior governor go to prison. Yet he still made the attempt. He ended up not benefitting because he just wasn't that good at shaking people down, and most of his staff wasn't that helpful. But he did try and he did know it was against the law. It doesn't matter if Greenlee or Harris or anyone else said these deals were legal, he is the governor, he's their boss and ultimately the responsibility falls to him for his actions.

The Fed came forward when they did because it really looked like he was going to succeed in pay to play for the senate seat. I really wonder what would have happened if he hadn't been stopped. In the end, he still expected Burris to raise funds for him too. He showed a pattern of illegal behavior in all of those solicitations.

The 800 pound gorilla in the room is that Rezko is nowhere to be found. The problem with the conspiracy is that most of the witnesses talked about it but with Rezko being there. the conspiracy was supposed to be between blago and Rezko. I think all of this is hearsay so far. The feds case is put on a tape then get a third party to talk about the tape to convey the mindset of Blago. I think the case really stinks so far. Would any of you calling for guilty want to face this? How many times have you said something you never intended to foolowup on? And even the tapes show that Blago wanted deals like Dashal's wife got. So if they are legit then that's what he wanted. Blago is a jerk, narcistic, lazy, foul mouth, idiot and lousy governor. But that's not enought to convict.

yes but you have to actually take steps toward talking about it is not a crime to just say things especially what he said I serious, everyone would like to get money, with crimes like he is accused of they need to have more then talk. And I agree the racetrack is the thing that he seems guilty of, but he never told anyone the reason he was doing things they just assumed his thought process which if it was murder or the line for what was illegal and legal wasn't so fine it would be an issue. The problem comes down to the laws and the system(that new law about donations solves the problem for the governors office) everyday politicians have walked the fine line the system was(because theres no way you can tell what someone else is thinking as much as the government would like you to think- rods a wack job) set up so the only way you could be found guilty is if the govt could prove that if people didn't donate they couldn't do business and or the politicians tell them blatantly that without a donation there will be no business- who ever it was even said that edgar told him that he should donate. Basically the way the system was set up if you did business with the state you of course felt pressure, but until the new law passed it was only an ethical issue about whether it is right to ask people to donate to your campaign if they were befitting for state contracts that you controlled.

You don't have to finish the act when it's an attempt and many of the counts are attempts.

Well here's the thing. Isn't the talk and plans in and of themselves the crime? That's what conspiracy is, right? So whether or not the plans followed through, he certainly conspired to commit these crimes. I think the crime that's been proven the most is was the pressure on Johnson, the racetrack owner, to donate in order for a bill to pass that would make him (Johnson) a lot of money. There are a lot of phone calls as testimony that prove, without a doubt, that Blago explicitly asked for bribes before the year-end in exchange for the bill to be signed.

You don't have to actually commit a crime to be convicted on a conspiracy charge. And the prosecution has done a great job of arguing that he was serious about doing things he was talking about on the tapes. His goose is cooked.

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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Natasha Korecki published on July 11, 2010 7:57 PM.

Blagojevich's not-so-kind words to Illinois voters: (Bleep) all of you was the previous entry in this blog.

Blagojevich trial: Day 22 and week five recap is the next entry in this blog.

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