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AT CHICAGO'S GOETHE-INSTITUT: HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS TALK ABOUT "HOME"

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Home. It's a simple word, but one charged with meaning. And often it is only when one loses one's home -- the result of war, or political exile, or natural disaster, or financial collapse -- that the power of such a place becomes fully understood.

Survivors of the Holocaust -- and there are fewer and fewer of them these days as age takes its toll -- are keenly aware of what it means to leave everything that was familiar behind. The "lucky ones" were able to leave their homes in some sort of deliberate way -- fleeing to safety in the nick of time. Of course most of those caught up in the horrors of that period were not so lucky.

In her new book, "heim.at.home -- Displaced and returned to a new home," the young Vienna-based author Diana Gregor tells the story of 10 Holocaust survivors' relationship to their homeland. They are Austrians whose country turned into a dangerous and alien place practically overnight. But all managed to escape to the United States - some with more, and some with fewer difficulties - to start a new life in New York.

Gregor will be in Chicago this week to present her book, with a reading and discussion in English to be held March 21 at 6 p.m. at the Goethe-Institut Chicago, 150 N. Michigan (Suite 200). She will be joined in conversation by Professor Leon Stein, whose has had a long association with Roosevelt University, done extensive research on the Holocaust, and created a curriculum on the Holocaust for the public schools of Illinois. The event is free and open to the public.

Enhanced by the images of photographer David Plakke, Gregor's book is an outgrowth of her doctoral dissertation which focused on Jewish identity and language as a "home." From 2006-2011 she lived and worked in New York.

The book is the documentation and record of a "reconciliatory relationship" by Holocaust survivors with their native country, and the unshakable love of their old home that has remained intact for more than seven decades. This concept of a native land or "heimat" is shared by many Austrian Holocaust survivors and has prevented them from breaking off completely with Austria.

Gregor's project is notable for its innovative design. The book, published in 2012, and available in English and German, has been devised to serve as "a historical milestone for future generations." So it has accompanying apps for iPad, iPhone, and Android devices, available for free download through the respective online portals. The app, which was developed in English and German, includes essays, short videos and interviews, as well as interactive maps that retrace the journeys of the Holocaust survivors.

For additional information visit www.goethe.de/chicago.


Home. It's a simple word, but one charged with meaning. And often it is only when one loses one's home -- the result of war, or political exile, or natural disaster, or financial collapse -- that the power of such a place becomes fully understood.

Survivors of the Holocaust -- and there are fewer and fewer of them these days as age takes its toll -- are keenly aware of what it means to leave everything that was familiar behind. The "lucky ones" were able to leave their homes in some sort of deliberate way -- fleeing to safety in the nick of time. Of course most of those caught up in the horrors of that period were not so lucky.

In her new book, "heim.at.home -- Displaced and returned to a new home," the young Vienna-based author Diana Gregor tells the story of 10 Holocaust survivors' relationship to their homeland. They are Austrians whose country turned into a dangerous and alien place practically overnight. But all managed to escape to the United States - some with more, and some with fewer difficulties - to start a new life in New York.

Gregor will be in Chicago this week to present her book, with a reading and discussion in English to be held March 21 at 6 p.m. at the Goethe-Institut Chicago, 150 N. Michigan (Suite 200). She will be joined in conversation by Professor Leon Stein, whose has had a long association with Roosevelt University, done extensive research on the Holocaust, and created a curriculum on the Holocaust for the public schools of Illinois. The event is free and open to the public.

Enhanced by the images of photographer David Plakke, Gregor's book is an outgrowth of her doctoral dissertation which focused on Jewish identity and language as a "home." From 2006-2011 she lived and worked in New York.

The book is the documentation and record of a "reconciliatory relationship" by Holocaust survivors with their native country, and the unshakable love of their old home that has remained intact for more than seven decades. This concept of a native land or "heimat" is shared by many Austrian Holocaust survivors and has prevented them from breaking off completely with Austria.

Gregor's project is notable for its innovative design. The book, published in 2012, and available in English and German, has been devised to serve as "a historical milestone for future generations." So it has accompanying apps for iPad, iPhone, and Android devices, available for free download through the respective online portals. The app, which was developed in English and German, includes essays, short videos and interviews, as well as interactive maps that retrace the journeys of the Holocaust survivors.

For additional information visit www.goethe.de/chicago.

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This page contains a single entry by Hedy Weiss published on March 17, 2013 2:10 PM.

COURT THEATRE DEVISES A BEAUTIFUL "PROOF" was the previous entry in this blog.

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